Physical activity attenuates the effect of increased left ventricular mass on the risk of ischemic stroke: The northern Manhattan stroke study

Carlos J. Rodriguez, Ralph L. Sacco, Robert R. Sciacca, Bernadette Boden-Albala, Shunichi Homma, Marco R. Di Tullio

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to determine whether the risk of ischemic stroke associated with increased left ventricular mass (LVM) is modified by physical activity (PA). BACKGROUND: Increased LVM is associated with an increased risk for stroke. Physical activity can decrease the risk of stroke and may have variable effects on LVM. METHODS: We used a case-control study design in a multiethnic population in northern Manhattan, New York, to study 394 case subjects who had a first ischemic stroke and 413 stroke-free control subjects. All subjects were interviewed and two-dimensional echocardiograms obtained to determine LVM. RESULTS: A sharp increase in risk of ischemic stroke was seen in the highest quartile of LVM (odds ratio [OR]: 6.14 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 3.04 to 12.38]). Thus, increased LVM was defined by the highest quartile of LVM. In multivariate analysis, the effect of increased LVM on the risk of stroke was significantly decreased by the presence of any level of PA versus no PA (OR: 1.59 [95% CI: 0.99 to 2.57] p < 0.07 vs. 3.53 [95% CI: 1.94 to 6.42] p < 0.0001). Although PA decreased the risk of stroke in all patients, the effect was stronger in subjects with increased LVM than among those without increased LVM (p = 0.033). CONCLUSIONS: Increased LVM is associated with an increased risk of stroke, especially among sedentary patients. Physical activity decreases the risk of stroke among patents with increased LVM to a level comparable to that of patients without increased LVM. Recommending PA may be a nonpharmacologic tool to reduce the stroke risk, especially among patients with increased LVM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1482-1488
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Stroke
Exercise
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Patents
Case-Control Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Physical activity attenuates the effect of increased left ventricular mass on the risk of ischemic stroke : The northern Manhattan stroke study. / Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Sciacca, Robert R.; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Homma, Shunichi; Di Tullio, Marco R.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 39, No. 9, 01.05.2002, p. 1482-1488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodriguez, Carlos J. ; Sacco, Ralph L. ; Sciacca, Robert R. ; Boden-Albala, Bernadette ; Homma, Shunichi ; Di Tullio, Marco R. / Physical activity attenuates the effect of increased left ventricular mass on the risk of ischemic stroke : The northern Manhattan stroke study. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2002 ; Vol. 39, No. 9. pp. 1482-1488.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to determine whether the risk of ischemic stroke associated with increased left ventricular mass (LVM) is modified by physical activity (PA). BACKGROUND: Increased LVM is associated with an increased risk for stroke. Physical activity can decrease the risk of stroke and may have variable effects on LVM. METHODS: We used a case-control study design in a multiethnic population in northern Manhattan, New York, to study 394 case subjects who had a first ischemic stroke and 413 stroke-free control subjects. All subjects were interviewed and two-dimensional echocardiograms obtained to determine LVM. RESULTS: A sharp increase in risk of ischemic stroke was seen in the highest quartile of LVM (odds ratio [OR]: 6.14 [95{\%} confidence interval {CI}: 3.04 to 12.38]). Thus, increased LVM was defined by the highest quartile of LVM. In multivariate analysis, the effect of increased LVM on the risk of stroke was significantly decreased by the presence of any level of PA versus no PA (OR: 1.59 [95{\%} CI: 0.99 to 2.57] p < 0.07 vs. 3.53 [95{\%} CI: 1.94 to 6.42] p < 0.0001). Although PA decreased the risk of stroke in all patients, the effect was stronger in subjects with increased LVM than among those without increased LVM (p = 0.033). CONCLUSIONS: Increased LVM is associated with an increased risk of stroke, especially among sedentary patients. Physical activity decreases the risk of stroke among patents with increased LVM to a level comparable to that of patients without increased LVM. Recommending PA may be a nonpharmacologic tool to reduce the stroke risk, especially among patients with increased LVM.",
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AU - Rodriguez, Carlos J.

AU - Sacco, Ralph L.

AU - Sciacca, Robert R.

AU - Boden-Albala, Bernadette

AU - Homma, Shunichi

AU - Di Tullio, Marco R.

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to determine whether the risk of ischemic stroke associated with increased left ventricular mass (LVM) is modified by physical activity (PA). BACKGROUND: Increased LVM is associated with an increased risk for stroke. Physical activity can decrease the risk of stroke and may have variable effects on LVM. METHODS: We used a case-control study design in a multiethnic population in northern Manhattan, New York, to study 394 case subjects who had a first ischemic stroke and 413 stroke-free control subjects. All subjects were interviewed and two-dimensional echocardiograms obtained to determine LVM. RESULTS: A sharp increase in risk of ischemic stroke was seen in the highest quartile of LVM (odds ratio [OR]: 6.14 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 3.04 to 12.38]). Thus, increased LVM was defined by the highest quartile of LVM. In multivariate analysis, the effect of increased LVM on the risk of stroke was significantly decreased by the presence of any level of PA versus no PA (OR: 1.59 [95% CI: 0.99 to 2.57] p < 0.07 vs. 3.53 [95% CI: 1.94 to 6.42] p < 0.0001). Although PA decreased the risk of stroke in all patients, the effect was stronger in subjects with increased LVM than among those without increased LVM (p = 0.033). CONCLUSIONS: Increased LVM is associated with an increased risk of stroke, especially among sedentary patients. Physical activity decreases the risk of stroke among patents with increased LVM to a level comparable to that of patients without increased LVM. Recommending PA may be a nonpharmacologic tool to reduce the stroke risk, especially among patients with increased LVM.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to determine whether the risk of ischemic stroke associated with increased left ventricular mass (LVM) is modified by physical activity (PA). BACKGROUND: Increased LVM is associated with an increased risk for stroke. Physical activity can decrease the risk of stroke and may have variable effects on LVM. METHODS: We used a case-control study design in a multiethnic population in northern Manhattan, New York, to study 394 case subjects who had a first ischemic stroke and 413 stroke-free control subjects. All subjects were interviewed and two-dimensional echocardiograms obtained to determine LVM. RESULTS: A sharp increase in risk of ischemic stroke was seen in the highest quartile of LVM (odds ratio [OR]: 6.14 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 3.04 to 12.38]). Thus, increased LVM was defined by the highest quartile of LVM. In multivariate analysis, the effect of increased LVM on the risk of stroke was significantly decreased by the presence of any level of PA versus no PA (OR: 1.59 [95% CI: 0.99 to 2.57] p < 0.07 vs. 3.53 [95% CI: 1.94 to 6.42] p < 0.0001). Although PA decreased the risk of stroke in all patients, the effect was stronger in subjects with increased LVM than among those without increased LVM (p = 0.033). CONCLUSIONS: Increased LVM is associated with an increased risk of stroke, especially among sedentary patients. Physical activity decreases the risk of stroke among patents with increased LVM to a level comparable to that of patients without increased LVM. Recommending PA may be a nonpharmacologic tool to reduce the stroke risk, especially among patients with increased LVM.

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