Pain is not associated with worse office-based buprenorphine treatment outcomes

Aaron D. Fox, Nancy L. Sohler, Joanna L. Starrels, Yuming Ning, Angela Giovanniello, Chinazo O. Cunningham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physical pain is common among individuals seeking treatment for opioid dependence. Pain may negatively impact addiction treatment. The authors prospectively studied opioid-dependent individuals initiating office-based buprenorphine treatment, comparing buprenorphine treatment outcomes (treatment retention and opioid use) among participants with and without pain (baseline pain or persistent pain). Among 82 participants, 60% reported baseline pain and 38% reported persistent pain. Overall, treatment retention was 56% and opioid use decreased from 89% to 26% over 6 months. In multivariable analyses, the authors found no association between pain and buprenorphine treatment outcomes. Opioid-dependent individuals with and without pain can achieve similar success with buprenorphine treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number638734
Pages (from-to)361-365
Number of pages5
JournalSubstance Abuse
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

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Buprenorphine
Pain
Opioid Analgesics
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Buprenorphine
  • chronic pain
  • opioid dependence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pain is not associated with worse office-based buprenorphine treatment outcomes. / Fox, Aaron D.; Sohler, Nancy L.; Starrels, Joanna L.; Ning, Yuming; Giovanniello, Angela; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

In: Substance Abuse, Vol. 33, No. 4, 638734, 01.10.2012, p. 361-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fox, Aaron D. ; Sohler, Nancy L. ; Starrels, Joanna L. ; Ning, Yuming ; Giovanniello, Angela ; Cunningham, Chinazo O. / Pain is not associated with worse office-based buprenorphine treatment outcomes. In: Substance Abuse. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 361-365.
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