Organizational culture predicts job satisfaction and perceived clinical effectiveness in pediatric primary care practices

Kevin Brazil, Dorothy B. Wakefield, Michelle M. Cloutier, Howard Tennen, Charles B. Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In recent years, there has been a growing understanding that organizational culture is related to an organization's performance. However, fewstudies have examined organizational culture in medical group practices. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of organizational culture on provider job satisfaction and perceived clinical effectiveness in primary care pediatric practices. Research Design: This cross-sectional study included 36 primary care pediatric practices located in Connecticut. Participants: There were 374 participants in this study, which included 127 clinicians and 247 nonclinicians. Measures: Office managers completed a questionnaire that recorded staff and practice characteristics; all participants completed the Organizational Culture Scale, a questionnaire that assessed the practice on four cultural domains (i.e., group, developmental, rational, and hierarchical), and the Primary Care Organizational Questionnaire that evaluated perceived effectiveness and job satisfaction. Results: Hierarchical linear models using a restricted maximum likelihood estimation method were used to evaluate whether the practice culture types predicted job satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Group culture was positively associated with both satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. In contrast, hierarchical and rational culture were negatively associated with both job satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. These relationships were true for clinicians, nonclinicians, and the practice as a whole. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that practice culture is associated with job satisfaction and perceived clinical effectiveness and that a group culture was associated with high job satisfaction and perceived effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-371
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Care Management Review
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Fingerprint

Organizational Culture
Job Satisfaction
Primary Health Care
Pediatrics
Group Practice
Job satisfaction
Organizational culture
Primary care
Linear Models
Research Design
Cross-Sectional Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • clinical effectiveness
  • job satisfaction
  • organizational culture
  • primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Leadership and Management
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Organizational culture predicts job satisfaction and perceived clinical effectiveness in pediatric primary care practices. / Brazil, Kevin; Wakefield, Dorothy B.; Cloutier, Michelle M.; Tennen, Howard; Hall, Charles B.

In: Health Care Management Review, Vol. 35, No. 4, 10.2010, p. 365-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brazil, Kevin ; Wakefield, Dorothy B. ; Cloutier, Michelle M. ; Tennen, Howard ; Hall, Charles B. / Organizational culture predicts job satisfaction and perceived clinical effectiveness in pediatric primary care practices. In: Health Care Management Review. 2010 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 365-371.
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