Obstructive sleep apnea risk and psychological health among non-Hispanic blacks in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome (MetSO) cohort study

Mirnova E. Ceide, Natasha J. Williams, Azizi Seixas, Samantha K. Longman-Mills, Girardin Jean-Louis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study assessed associations of depression and anxiety with risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among non-Hispanic blacks in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome (MetSO) study. Method: A total of 1,035 patients participated. ARESTM score ≥6 defined high OSA risk. Moderate depression was defined by a CES-D score ≥16. Moderate anxiety was measured by a BAI score ≥16. Results: The mean age was 62 ± 14 years; 70% were female. A total of 93% were diagnosed with hypertension; 61%, diabetes; and 72%, dyslipidemia; 90% were overweight/obese; 33% had a history of heart disease; and 10% had a stroke. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age and gender, showed that patients with depression had nearly two-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.02–2.98, p <0.05). Patients with anxiety had three-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA (OR 3.30, 95% CI 2.11–5.15, p <0.01). After adjusting for marital status and income, patients with anxiety had a 6% increase in OSA risk (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.04–1.09, p <0.05), but depression was no longer significant. Conclusion: Our results suggest that non-Hispanic blacks with metabolic syndrome who experience anxiety and/or depression should be screened for OSA.Key messagesThis study assessed associations of moderate to severe depression and anxiety with risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among non-Hispanic blacks with metabolic syndrome.Patients with depression had nearly two-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA.Patients with anxiety had three-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 20 2015

Fingerprint

Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Cohort Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Psychology
Anxiety
Health
Depression
Marital Status
Dyslipidemias
Heart Diseases
Logistic Models
Stroke
Regression Analysis
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Metabolic syndrome
  • non-Hispanic blacks
  • obstructive sleep apnea
  • psychological health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Obstructive sleep apnea risk and psychological health among non-Hispanic blacks in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome (MetSO) cohort study. / Ceide, Mirnova E.; Williams, Natasha J.; Seixas, Azizi; Longman-Mills, Samantha K.; Jean-Louis, Girardin.

In: Annals of Medicine, 20.11.2015, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ceide, Mirnova E. ; Williams, Natasha J. ; Seixas, Azizi ; Longman-Mills, Samantha K. ; Jean-Louis, Girardin. / Obstructive sleep apnea risk and psychological health among non-Hispanic blacks in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome (MetSO) cohort study. In: Annals of Medicine. 2015 ; pp. 1-7.
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abstract = "Introduction: This study assessed associations of depression and anxiety with risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among non-Hispanic blacks in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome (MetSO) study. Method: A total of 1,035 patients participated. ARESTM score ≥6 defined high OSA risk. Moderate depression was defined by a CES-D score ≥16. Moderate anxiety was measured by a BAI score ≥16. Results: The mean age was 62 ± 14 years; 70{\%} were female. A total of 93{\%} were diagnosed with hypertension; 61{\%}, diabetes; and 72{\%}, dyslipidemia; 90{\%} were overweight/obese; 33{\%} had a history of heart disease; and 10{\%} had a stroke. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age and gender, showed that patients with depression had nearly two-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA (OR 1.75, 95{\%} CI 1.02–2.98, p <0.05). Patients with anxiety had three-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA (OR 3.30, 95{\%} CI 2.11–5.15, p <0.01). After adjusting for marital status and income, patients with anxiety had a 6{\%} increase in OSA risk (OR 1.06, 95{\%} CI 1.04–1.09, p <0.05), but depression was no longer significant. Conclusion: Our results suggest that non-Hispanic blacks with metabolic syndrome who experience anxiety and/or depression should be screened for OSA.Key messagesThis study assessed associations of moderate to severe depression and anxiety with risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among non-Hispanic blacks with metabolic syndrome.Patients with depression had nearly two-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA.Patients with anxiety had three-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA.",
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N2 - Introduction: This study assessed associations of depression and anxiety with risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among non-Hispanic blacks in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome (MetSO) study. Method: A total of 1,035 patients participated. ARESTM score ≥6 defined high OSA risk. Moderate depression was defined by a CES-D score ≥16. Moderate anxiety was measured by a BAI score ≥16. Results: The mean age was 62 ± 14 years; 70% were female. A total of 93% were diagnosed with hypertension; 61%, diabetes; and 72%, dyslipidemia; 90% were overweight/obese; 33% had a history of heart disease; and 10% had a stroke. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age and gender, showed that patients with depression had nearly two-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.02–2.98, p <0.05). Patients with anxiety had three-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA (OR 3.30, 95% CI 2.11–5.15, p <0.01). After adjusting for marital status and income, patients with anxiety had a 6% increase in OSA risk (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.04–1.09, p <0.05), but depression was no longer significant. Conclusion: Our results suggest that non-Hispanic blacks with metabolic syndrome who experience anxiety and/or depression should be screened for OSA.Key messagesThis study assessed associations of moderate to severe depression and anxiety with risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among non-Hispanic blacks with metabolic syndrome.Patients with depression had nearly two-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA.Patients with anxiety had three-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA.

AB - Introduction: This study assessed associations of depression and anxiety with risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among non-Hispanic blacks in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome (MetSO) study. Method: A total of 1,035 patients participated. ARESTM score ≥6 defined high OSA risk. Moderate depression was defined by a CES-D score ≥16. Moderate anxiety was measured by a BAI score ≥16. Results: The mean age was 62 ± 14 years; 70% were female. A total of 93% were diagnosed with hypertension; 61%, diabetes; and 72%, dyslipidemia; 90% were overweight/obese; 33% had a history of heart disease; and 10% had a stroke. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age and gender, showed that patients with depression had nearly two-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.02–2.98, p <0.05). Patients with anxiety had three-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA (OR 3.30, 95% CI 2.11–5.15, p <0.01). After adjusting for marital status and income, patients with anxiety had a 6% increase in OSA risk (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.04–1.09, p <0.05), but depression was no longer significant. Conclusion: Our results suggest that non-Hispanic blacks with metabolic syndrome who experience anxiety and/or depression should be screened for OSA.Key messagesThis study assessed associations of moderate to severe depression and anxiety with risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among non-Hispanic blacks with metabolic syndrome.Patients with depression had nearly two-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA.Patients with anxiety had three-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA.

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KW - psychological health

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