Newborn screening and the obstetrician

Nancy C. Rose, Siobhan M. Dolan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Newborn screening is the largest genetic screening program in the United States with approximately four million newborns screened yearly. It has been available and in continuous development for more than 50 years. Each state manages, funds, and maintains its own individual program, which encompasses newborn screening as well as the diagnosis and coordination of care for affected infants and children. The ideal disorder for screening is one in which newborn intervention prevents later disabilities or death for infants who may appear normal at birth. There are 31 core conditions that are currently recommended for incorporation into state screening programs. To obtain a sample, several drops of blood are collected from the newborn's heel and applied to filter paper. Although testing for core disorders is fairly standardized, more extensive screening varies by state and the rigorous evaluation of new disorders for inclusion in state screening panels is ongoing. As genomic medicine becomes more accessible, screening newborns for chronic diseases that may affect their long-term health will need to be addressed as well as the use of the residual blood spots for research. Obstetric providers should, at some time during pregnancy, review the basic process of newborn screening with parents to prepare them for this testing in the neonatal period. This information can be reviewed as it best suits incorporation in an individual's practice; verbal discussion and the distribution of written materials with resources for further information are encouraged.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)908-917
Number of pages10
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume120
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Newborn Infant
Infant Care
Heel
Genetic Testing
Financial Management
Child Care
Obstetrics
Chronic Disease
Parents
Medicine
Parturition
Pregnancy
Health
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Newborn screening and the obstetrician. / Rose, Nancy C.; Dolan, Siobhan M.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 120, No. 4, 10.2012, p. 908-917.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rose, Nancy C. ; Dolan, Siobhan M. / Newborn screening and the obstetrician. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2012 ; Vol. 120, No. 4. pp. 908-917.
@article{8b769bd31e0b4bfface83cbeb2ae709a,
title = "Newborn screening and the obstetrician",
abstract = "Newborn screening is the largest genetic screening program in the United States with approximately four million newborns screened yearly. It has been available and in continuous development for more than 50 years. Each state manages, funds, and maintains its own individual program, which encompasses newborn screening as well as the diagnosis and coordination of care for affected infants and children. The ideal disorder for screening is one in which newborn intervention prevents later disabilities or death for infants who may appear normal at birth. There are 31 core conditions that are currently recommended for incorporation into state screening programs. To obtain a sample, several drops of blood are collected from the newborn's heel and applied to filter paper. Although testing for core disorders is fairly standardized, more extensive screening varies by state and the rigorous evaluation of new disorders for inclusion in state screening panels is ongoing. As genomic medicine becomes more accessible, screening newborns for chronic diseases that may affect their long-term health will need to be addressed as well as the use of the residual blood spots for research. Obstetric providers should, at some time during pregnancy, review the basic process of newborn screening with parents to prepare them for this testing in the neonatal period. This information can be reviewed as it best suits incorporation in an individual's practice; verbal discussion and the distribution of written materials with resources for further information are encouraged.",
author = "Rose, {Nancy C.} and Dolan, {Siobhan M.}",
year = "2012",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1097/AOG.0b013e31826b2f03",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "120",
pages = "908--917",
journal = "Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "0029-7844",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Newborn screening and the obstetrician

AU - Rose, Nancy C.

AU - Dolan, Siobhan M.

PY - 2012/10

Y1 - 2012/10

N2 - Newborn screening is the largest genetic screening program in the United States with approximately four million newborns screened yearly. It has been available and in continuous development for more than 50 years. Each state manages, funds, and maintains its own individual program, which encompasses newborn screening as well as the diagnosis and coordination of care for affected infants and children. The ideal disorder for screening is one in which newborn intervention prevents later disabilities or death for infants who may appear normal at birth. There are 31 core conditions that are currently recommended for incorporation into state screening programs. To obtain a sample, several drops of blood are collected from the newborn's heel and applied to filter paper. Although testing for core disorders is fairly standardized, more extensive screening varies by state and the rigorous evaluation of new disorders for inclusion in state screening panels is ongoing. As genomic medicine becomes more accessible, screening newborns for chronic diseases that may affect their long-term health will need to be addressed as well as the use of the residual blood spots for research. Obstetric providers should, at some time during pregnancy, review the basic process of newborn screening with parents to prepare them for this testing in the neonatal period. This information can be reviewed as it best suits incorporation in an individual's practice; verbal discussion and the distribution of written materials with resources for further information are encouraged.

AB - Newborn screening is the largest genetic screening program in the United States with approximately four million newborns screened yearly. It has been available and in continuous development for more than 50 years. Each state manages, funds, and maintains its own individual program, which encompasses newborn screening as well as the diagnosis and coordination of care for affected infants and children. The ideal disorder for screening is one in which newborn intervention prevents later disabilities or death for infants who may appear normal at birth. There are 31 core conditions that are currently recommended for incorporation into state screening programs. To obtain a sample, several drops of blood are collected from the newborn's heel and applied to filter paper. Although testing for core disorders is fairly standardized, more extensive screening varies by state and the rigorous evaluation of new disorders for inclusion in state screening panels is ongoing. As genomic medicine becomes more accessible, screening newborns for chronic diseases that may affect their long-term health will need to be addressed as well as the use of the residual blood spots for research. Obstetric providers should, at some time during pregnancy, review the basic process of newborn screening with parents to prepare them for this testing in the neonatal period. This information can be reviewed as it best suits incorporation in an individual's practice; verbal discussion and the distribution of written materials with resources for further information are encouraged.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84866938199&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84866938199&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31826b2f03

DO - 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31826b2f03

M3 - Article

C2 - 22996108

AN - SCOPUS:84866938199

VL - 120

SP - 908

EP - 917

JO - Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 0029-7844

IS - 4

ER -