Neurogenic Claudication-Operative Management (Decompression and Fusion)

Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Reza Yassari, Timothy F. Witham

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Neurogenic claudication describes buttock and leg pain that develops upon ambulation and may be relieved with rest, sitting or flexion of the spine. Spinal stenosis refers to a narrowing of the caliber of the spinal canal: the resultant compression of neural structures and the microvasculature can lead to the development of neurogenic claudication. Patients with spinal stenosis who continue to be symptomatic despite a reasonable trial of conservative therapy may benefit from surgical decompression. A fusion operation is often performed in addition to decompression if there is evidence of gross instability from spondylolisthesis, spinal deformity, or concern for the development of iatrogenic post-operative instability (due to extensive resection of the facet joints). Although the peri-operative mortality of patients undergoing decompression with or without fusion is low, there are a number of immediate post-operative complications that can occur, including surgical site infections and nerve root injury from instrumentation misplacement. Potential long-term complications include instrumentation failure, adjacent segment disease, and pseudoarthrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEvidence-Based Orthopedics
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages686-693
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)1405184760, 9781405184762
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 31 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spinal Stenosis
Decompression
Zygapophyseal Joint
Surgical Wound Infection
Surgical Decompression
Spondylolisthesis
Pseudarthrosis
Buttocks
Spinal Canal
Microvessels
Walking
Leg
Spine
Pain
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries
Conservative Treatment

Keywords

  • Degenerative spondylolisthesis
  • Lumbar spine
  • Neurogenic claudication
  • Post-operative complications
  • Spinal decompression
  • Spinal fusion
  • Spinal stenosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dasenbrock, H. H., Yassari, R., & Witham, T. F. (2011). Neurogenic Claudication-Operative Management (Decompression and Fusion). In Evidence-Based Orthopedics (pp. 686-693). Wiley-Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444345100.ch80

Neurogenic Claudication-Operative Management (Decompression and Fusion). / Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H.; Yassari, Reza; Witham, Timothy F.

Evidence-Based Orthopedics. Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. p. 686-693.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Dasenbrock, HH, Yassari, R & Witham, TF 2011, Neurogenic Claudication-Operative Management (Decompression and Fusion). in Evidence-Based Orthopedics. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 686-693. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444345100.ch80
Dasenbrock HH, Yassari R, Witham TF. Neurogenic Claudication-Operative Management (Decompression and Fusion). In Evidence-Based Orthopedics. Wiley-Blackwell. 2011. p. 686-693 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444345100.ch80
Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H. ; Yassari, Reza ; Witham, Timothy F. / Neurogenic Claudication-Operative Management (Decompression and Fusion). Evidence-Based Orthopedics. Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. pp. 686-693
@inbook{d9203ff1ded04442a2756e90b75be374,
title = "Neurogenic Claudication-Operative Management (Decompression and Fusion)",
abstract = "Neurogenic claudication describes buttock and leg pain that develops upon ambulation and may be relieved with rest, sitting or flexion of the spine. Spinal stenosis refers to a narrowing of the caliber of the spinal canal: the resultant compression of neural structures and the microvasculature can lead to the development of neurogenic claudication. Patients with spinal stenosis who continue to be symptomatic despite a reasonable trial of conservative therapy may benefit from surgical decompression. A fusion operation is often performed in addition to decompression if there is evidence of gross instability from spondylolisthesis, spinal deformity, or concern for the development of iatrogenic post-operative instability (due to extensive resection of the facet joints). Although the peri-operative mortality of patients undergoing decompression with or without fusion is low, there are a number of immediate post-operative complications that can occur, including surgical site infections and nerve root injury from instrumentation misplacement. Potential long-term complications include instrumentation failure, adjacent segment disease, and pseudoarthrosis.",
keywords = "Degenerative spondylolisthesis, Lumbar spine, Neurogenic claudication, Post-operative complications, Spinal decompression, Spinal fusion, Spinal stenosis",
author = "Dasenbrock, {Hormuzdiyar H.} and Reza Yassari and Witham, {Timothy F.}",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1002/9781444345100.ch80",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "1405184760",
pages = "686--693",
booktitle = "Evidence-Based Orthopedics",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Neurogenic Claudication-Operative Management (Decompression and Fusion)

AU - Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H.

AU - Yassari, Reza

AU - Witham, Timothy F.

PY - 2011/10/31

Y1 - 2011/10/31

N2 - Neurogenic claudication describes buttock and leg pain that develops upon ambulation and may be relieved with rest, sitting or flexion of the spine. Spinal stenosis refers to a narrowing of the caliber of the spinal canal: the resultant compression of neural structures and the microvasculature can lead to the development of neurogenic claudication. Patients with spinal stenosis who continue to be symptomatic despite a reasonable trial of conservative therapy may benefit from surgical decompression. A fusion operation is often performed in addition to decompression if there is evidence of gross instability from spondylolisthesis, spinal deformity, or concern for the development of iatrogenic post-operative instability (due to extensive resection of the facet joints). Although the peri-operative mortality of patients undergoing decompression with or without fusion is low, there are a number of immediate post-operative complications that can occur, including surgical site infections and nerve root injury from instrumentation misplacement. Potential long-term complications include instrumentation failure, adjacent segment disease, and pseudoarthrosis.

AB - Neurogenic claudication describes buttock and leg pain that develops upon ambulation and may be relieved with rest, sitting or flexion of the spine. Spinal stenosis refers to a narrowing of the caliber of the spinal canal: the resultant compression of neural structures and the microvasculature can lead to the development of neurogenic claudication. Patients with spinal stenosis who continue to be symptomatic despite a reasonable trial of conservative therapy may benefit from surgical decompression. A fusion operation is often performed in addition to decompression if there is evidence of gross instability from spondylolisthesis, spinal deformity, or concern for the development of iatrogenic post-operative instability (due to extensive resection of the facet joints). Although the peri-operative mortality of patients undergoing decompression with or without fusion is low, there are a number of immediate post-operative complications that can occur, including surgical site infections and nerve root injury from instrumentation misplacement. Potential long-term complications include instrumentation failure, adjacent segment disease, and pseudoarthrosis.

KW - Degenerative spondylolisthesis

KW - Lumbar spine

KW - Neurogenic claudication

KW - Post-operative complications

KW - Spinal decompression

KW - Spinal fusion

KW - Spinal stenosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84885832068&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84885832068&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/9781444345100.ch80

DO - 10.1002/9781444345100.ch80

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84885832068

SN - 1405184760

SN - 9781405184762

SP - 686

EP - 693

BT - Evidence-Based Orthopedics

PB - Wiley-Blackwell

ER -