Network clustering revealed the systemic alterations of mitochondrial protein expression

Jouhyun Jeon, Jae Hoon Jeong, Je Hyun Baek, Hyun Jung Koo, Wook Ha Park, Jae Seong Yang, Myeong Hee Yu, Sanguk Kim, Youngmi Kim Pak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mitochondrial protein repertoire varies depending on the cellular state. Protein component modifications caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion are related to a wide range of human diseases; however, little is known about how nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins (mt proteome) changes under such dysfunctional states. In this study, we investigated the systemic alterations of mtDNA-depleted (ρ0) mitochondria by using network analysis of gene expression data. By modularizing the quantified proteomics data into protein functional networks, systemic properties of mitochondrial dysfunction were analyzed. We discovered that up-regulated and down-regulated proteins were organized into two predominant subnetworks that exhibited distinct biological processes. The down-regulated network modules are involved in typical mitochondrial functions, while up-regulated proteins are responsible for mtDNA repair and regulation of mt protein expression and transport. Furthermore, comparisons of proteome and transcriptome data revealed that ρ0 cells attempted to compensate for mtDNA depletion by modulating the coordinated expression/transport of mt proteins. Our results demonstrate that mt protein composition changed to remodel the functional organization of mitochondrial protein networks in response to dysfunctional cellular states. Human mt protein functional networks provide a framework for understanding how cells respond to mitochondrial dysfunctions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1002093
JournalPLoS Computational Biology
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mitochondrial Proteins
Cluster Analysis
protein synthesis
Clustering
Proteins
Protein
Mitochondrial DNA
protein
mitochondrial DNA
proteins
Proteome
protein transport
proteome
DNA
Biological Phenomena
Depletion
Protein Transport
Transcriptome
DNA Repair
Proteomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Ecology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

Jeon, J., Jeong, J. H., Baek, J. H., Koo, H. J., Park, W. H., Yang, J. S., ... Pak, Y. K. (2011). Network clustering revealed the systemic alterations of mitochondrial protein expression. PLoS Computational Biology, 7(6), [e1002093]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002093

Network clustering revealed the systemic alterations of mitochondrial protein expression. / Jeon, Jouhyun; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Baek, Je Hyun; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Wook Ha; Yang, Jae Seong; Yu, Myeong Hee; Kim, Sanguk; Pak, Youngmi Kim.

In: PLoS Computational Biology, Vol. 7, No. 6, e1002093, 01.06.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jeon, J, Jeong, JH, Baek, JH, Koo, HJ, Park, WH, Yang, JS, Yu, MH, Kim, S & Pak, YK 2011, 'Network clustering revealed the systemic alterations of mitochondrial protein expression', PLoS Computational Biology, vol. 7, no. 6, e1002093. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002093
Jeon, Jouhyun ; Jeong, Jae Hoon ; Baek, Je Hyun ; Koo, Hyun Jung ; Park, Wook Ha ; Yang, Jae Seong ; Yu, Myeong Hee ; Kim, Sanguk ; Pak, Youngmi Kim. / Network clustering revealed the systemic alterations of mitochondrial protein expression. In: PLoS Computational Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 7, No. 6.
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