Muscularity in adult humans

Proportion of adipose tissue-free body mass as skeletal muscle

Zimian Wang, Moonseong Heo, Robert C. Lee, Donald P. Kotler, Robert T. Withers, Steven B. Heymsfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Muscularity, or the proportion of adipose tissue-free body mass (ATFM) as skeletal muscle (SM), provides valuable body composition information, especially for age-related SM loss (i.e., sarcopenia). Limited data from elderly cadavers suggest a relatively constant SM/ATFM ratio, 0.540 ± 0.046 for men (mean ± SD, n = 6) and 0.489 ± 0.049 for women (n = 7). The aim of the present study was to examine the magnitude and constancy of the SM/ATFM ratio in healthy adults. Whole-body SM and ATFM were measured using multi-scan magnetic resonance imaging. The SM/ATFM ratio was 0.528 ± 0.036 for men (n = 139) and 0.473 ± 0.037 for women (n = 165). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the SM/ATFM ratio was significantly influenced by sex, age, body weight, and race. The four factors explained 50% of the observed between individual variation in the SM/ATFM ratio. After adjusting for age, body weight, and race, men had a larger SM/ATFM ratio than women. Both older men and women had a lower SM/ATFM ratio than younger subjects, although the relative reduction was greater in men. After adjustment for sex, age, and body weight, there were no significant differences in the SM/ATFM ratios between Asian, Caucasian, and Hispanic subjects. In contrast, African-American subjects had a significantly greater SM/ATFM ratio than subjects in the other three groups. In addition, the SM/ATFM ratio was significantly lower in AIDS patients than corresponding values in healthy subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)612-619
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Biology
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

body mass
adipose tissue
skeletal muscle
Adipose Tissue
muscle tissues
Skeletal Muscle
muscle
Muscles
body weight
Body Weight
tissue
sarcopenia
Sarcopenia
African American
gender
constancy
individual variation
acquired immune deficiency syndrome
African Americans
Body Composition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Muscularity in adult humans : Proportion of adipose tissue-free body mass as skeletal muscle. / Wang, Zimian; Heo, Moonseong; Lee, Robert C.; Kotler, Donald P.; Withers, Robert T.; Heymsfield, Steven B.

In: American Journal of Human Biology, Vol. 13, No. 5, 2001, p. 612-619.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Zimian ; Heo, Moonseong ; Lee, Robert C. ; Kotler, Donald P. ; Withers, Robert T. ; Heymsfield, Steven B. / Muscularity in adult humans : Proportion of adipose tissue-free body mass as skeletal muscle. In: American Journal of Human Biology. 2001 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 612-619.
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