Multiple Myeloma in Hispanics: Incidence, Characteristics, Survival, Results of Discovery, and Validation Using Real-World and Connect MM Registry Data

Gurbakhash Kaur, Mateo Mejia Saldarriaga, Nishi Shah, Donna D. Catamero, Lihua Yue, Nadia Ashai, Niyati Goradia, Joshua Heisler, Zhengrui Xiao, Natasha Ghalib, Tonya Aaron, Daniel Cole, Rebecca Foreman, Ioannis Mantzaris, Olga Derman, Lizamarie Bachier, R. Alejandro Sica, Noah Kornblum, Ira Braunschweig, Aditi ShastriSanjay Goel, Amit Verma, Murali Janakiram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) in Hispanics has never been studied. We therefore sought to determine the clinical characteristics and overall survival in MM of Hispanics compared to non-Hispanic whites (NHW) and non-Hispanic blacks (NHB). Patients and Methods: A single-center analysis of 939 patients diagnosed with MM from 2000 to 2017 with a large representation of NHB (n = 489), Hispanics (n = 281), and NHW (n = 169) was conducted to evaluate outcomes and disease characteristics. We used the Connect MM Registry, a large US multicenter prospective observational study with newly diagnosed MM patients, as a validation cohort. Results: Hispanics had a higher incidence of MM compared to NHW. The median age at presentation was 5 years younger (median, 65 years) in Hispanics compared to NHW (median, 70 years), and patients were more likely to present with renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30 mL/min). Hispanics had a higher proportion of Revised International Staging System (R-ISS) stage I disease compared to NHW and NHB (P = .03), while there was no difference in cytogenetics between Hispanics and NHB/NHW. In the multivariate analysis, only high-risk disease and response to first-line therapy significantly affected survival. Conclusion: In this first and largest analysis of MM in Hispanics, we found that Hispanics present at a younger age, have a higher incidence of renal dysfunction, and have low R-ISS stage disease at presentation. With equal access to therapy, Hispanics have survival similar to NHW/NHB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e384-e397
JournalClinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Healthcare disparities
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Incidence
  • Multiple myeloma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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