MR imaging

its role in detecting occult fractures

F. Feldman, R. Staron, A. Zwass, S. Rubin, Nogah Haramati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Magnetic resonance (MR) studies were performed on 30 consecutive patients who continued to be symptomatic despite negative or inconclusive findings on radiographs and other imaging studies including radionuclide bone scans, computed tomography, and/or polytomography. There were 9 men and 21 women, 20-92 years old (mean age 63 years) whose MR studies were done 3-72 h after frank trauma in 22 cases and in another 8 after 1-4 weeks of increasing pain subsequently attributed to trauma or unaccustomed effort. MR studies were performed using 0.5-T (Phillips) or 1.5-T (Phillips, GE) superconductive magnets. Results indicated that: (1) MR images allowed identification of acute fractures in an emergency room setting, as well as subtle subacute or chronic fractures in the context of strong clinical suspicions despite negative or inconclusive radiographs and other subsequently indecisive imaging studies. (2) MR imaging is the most sensitive way of documenting the earliest changes in traumatized osseous and soft tissue structures simultaneously.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-444
Number of pages6
JournalSkeletal Radiology
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Closed Fractures
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnets
Wounds and Injuries
Radioisotopes
Hospital Emergency Service
Tomography
Bone and Bones
Pain

Keywords

  • MRI acute fractures
  • MRI occult fractures
  • MRI undisplaced fractures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

MR imaging : its role in detecting occult fractures. / Feldman, F.; Staron, R.; Zwass, A.; Rubin, S.; Haramati, Nogah.

In: Skeletal Radiology, Vol. 23, No. 6, 08.1994, p. 439-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feldman, F, Staron, R, Zwass, A, Rubin, S & Haramati, N 1994, 'MR imaging: its role in detecting occult fractures', Skeletal Radiology, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 439-444. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00204604
Feldman, F. ; Staron, R. ; Zwass, A. ; Rubin, S. ; Haramati, Nogah. / MR imaging : its role in detecting occult fractures. In: Skeletal Radiology. 1994 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 439-444.
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