Mitotic kinesin inhibitors induce mitotic arrest and cell death in taxol-resistant and -sensitive cancer cells

Adam I. Marcus, Ulf Peters, Shala L. Thomas, Sarah C. Garrett, Amelia Zelnak, Tarun M. Kapoor, Paraskevi Giannakakou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

140 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Taxanes are powerful chemotherapy agents that target the microtubule cytoskeleton, leading to mitotic arrest and cell death; however, their clinical efficacy has been hampered due to the development of drug resistance. Therefore, other proteins involved in spindle assembly are being examined as potential targets for anticancer therapy. The mitotic kinesin, Eg5 is critical for proper spindle assembly; as such, inhibition of Eg5 leads to mitotic arrest making it a potential anticancer target. We wanted to validate Eg5 as a therapeutic target and determine if Eg5 inhibitors retain activity in Taxol-resistant cells. Using affinity chromatography we first show that the compound HR22C16 is an Eg5 inhibitor and does not interact with other microtubule motor proteins tested. Furthermore, HR22C16 along with its analogs, inhibit cell survival in both Taxol-sensitive and -resistant ovarian cancer cells with at least 15-fold greater efficacy than monastrol, the first generation Eg5 inhibitor. Further analysis with HR22C16-A1, the most potent HR22C16 analog, showed that it retains efficacy in PgP-overexpressing cells, suggesting that it is not a PgP substrate. We further show that HR22C16-A1 induces cell death following mitotic arrest via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Interestingly, the combination of HR22C16-A1 with Taxol results in an antagonistic anti-proliferative and antimitotic effect, possibly due to the abrogation of Taxol-induced mitotic spindles by HR22C16-A1. Taken together, our results show that Eg5 inhibitors have promising anticancer activity and can be potentially used to overcome Taxol resistance in the clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11569-11577
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume280
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 25 2005

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Kinesin
Cell death
Paclitaxel
Cell Death
Cells
Neoplasms
Microtubule Proteins
Antimitotic Agents
Affinity chromatography
Taxoids
Spindle Apparatus
Chemotherapy
HR22C16
Cytoskeleton
Affinity Chromatography
Drug Resistance
Microtubules
Ovarian Neoplasms
Cell Survival
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Mitotic kinesin inhibitors induce mitotic arrest and cell death in taxol-resistant and -sensitive cancer cells. / Marcus, Adam I.; Peters, Ulf; Thomas, Shala L.; Garrett, Sarah C.; Zelnak, Amelia; Kapoor, Tarun M.; Giannakakou, Paraskevi.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 280, No. 12, 25.03.2005, p. 11569-11577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marcus, Adam I. ; Peters, Ulf ; Thomas, Shala L. ; Garrett, Sarah C. ; Zelnak, Amelia ; Kapoor, Tarun M. ; Giannakakou, Paraskevi. / Mitotic kinesin inhibitors induce mitotic arrest and cell death in taxol-resistant and -sensitive cancer cells. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2005 ; Vol. 280, No. 12. pp. 11569-11577.
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