Metabolic cycling in single yeast cells from unsynchronized steady-state populations limited on glucose or phosphate

Sanford J. Silverman, Allegra A. Petti, Nikolai Slavov, Lance Parsons, Ryan Briehof, Stephan Y. Thiberge, Daniel Zenklusen, Saumil J. Gandhi, Daniel R. Larson, Robert H. Singer, David Botstein

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59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oscillations in patterns of expression of a large fraction of yeast genes are associated with the "metabolic cycle," usually seen only in prestarved, continuous cultures of yeast. We used FISH of mRNA in individual cells to test the hypothesis that these oscillations happen in single cells drawn from unsynchronized cultures growing exponentially in chemostats. Gene-expression data from synchronized cultures were used to predict coincident appearance of mRNAsfrom pairs of genes in the unsynchronized cells. Quantitative analysis of the FISH results shows that individual unsynchronized cells growing slowly because of glucose limitation or phosphate limitation show the predicted oscillations. We conclude that the yeast metabolic cycle is an intrinsic property of yeast metabolism and does not depend on either synchronization or external limitation of growth by the carbon source.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6946-6951
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume107
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 13 2010

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Keywords

  • Chemostat
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization
  • Single cells
  • mRNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Silverman, S. J., Petti, A. A., Slavov, N., Parsons, L., Briehof, R., Thiberge, S. Y., Zenklusen, D., Gandhi, S. J., Larson, D. R., Singer, R. H., & Botstein, D. (2010). Metabolic cycling in single yeast cells from unsynchronized steady-state populations limited on glucose or phosphate. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107(15), 6946-6951. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1002422107