Maternal Perceptions of Infant Hunger, Satiety, and Pressuring Feeding Styles in an Urban Latina WIC Population

Rachel S. Gross, Arthur H. Fierman, Alan L. Mendelsohn, Mary Ann Chiasson, Terry J. Rosenberg, Roberta Scheinmann, Mary Jo Messito

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Abstract

Objective: Controlling feeding styles in which parents regulate feeding without responding to child cues have been associated with poor self-regulation of feeding and increased weight, but have not been well studied in infancy. We sought to assess maternal perception of infant feeding cues and pressuring feeding styles in an urban Latina Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) population. Methods: Secondary analysis of a larger study of Latina mothers participating in New York City WIC programs. We examined maternal perception of infant feeding cues and pressuring feeding style. Using logistic regression, we assessed: 1) characteristics associated with perceptions of cues and pressuring to feed, including sociodemographics, breastfeeding, and maternal body mass index; and 2) whether perceptions of cues were associated with pressuring feeding style. Results: We surveyed 368 mothers (84% response rate). Most mothers perceived that babies sense their own satiety. However, 72% believed that infant crying must indicate hunger. Fifty-three percent believed that mothers should always make babies finish the bottle ("pressure to feed"). Pressuring feeding style was associated with foreign maternal country of birth (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66-5.60) and less than a high school education (AOR 1.81; 95% CI, 1.12-2.91). Two perceptions of feeding cues were related to pressuring feeding style: belief that infant crying must indicate hunger (AOR 2.59; 95% CI, 1.52-4.42) and infant hand sucking implies hunger (AOR 1.83; 95% CI, 1.10-3.03). Conclusions: Maternal characteristics influence perception of infant hunger and satiety. Interpretation of feeding cues is associated with pressuring feeding style. Improving responsiveness to infant cues should be a component of early childhood obesity prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-35
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2010

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Keywords

  • child obesity
  • infant feeding
  • infants
  • mothers
  • pressure to eat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Gross, R. S., Fierman, A. H., Mendelsohn, A. L., Chiasson, M. A., Rosenberg, T. J., Scheinmann, R., & Messito, M. J. (2010). Maternal Perceptions of Infant Hunger, Satiety, and Pressuring Feeding Styles in an Urban Latina WIC Population. Academic Pediatrics, 10(1), 29-35. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2009.08.001