Malignant Endometrial Polyps in Uterine Serous Carcinoma

The Prognostic Value of Polyp Size and Lymphovascular Invasion

Chensi Ouyang, Marina Frimer, Laura Y. Hou, Yanhua Wang, Gary L. Goldberg, June Y. Hou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) involving an endometrial polyp and concurrent extrauterine disease is associated with poor prognosis. We examined the clinicopathological profiles of patients with stage 1A USC with and without polyp involvement and the role of polyp size and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) as prognostic indicators for extrauterine disease in patients with early USC. Methods/Materials: From 2002 to 2014, 242 patients with pure USC were identified. Fisher exact test was used for categorical variables. The student t test was used for means. Logistic regression was used to compute the odds ratio for continuous and categorical variables. Results: Among stage 1A patients, the odds ratio of developing extrauterine disease for every 1 cm increase in polyp size is 1.368 (95% confidence interval, 1.034-1.810). Polyp size is only significantly associated with advanced stage disease for patients with myometrial invasion. A higher percent of LVI was found in stage 4 patients (31%). There is no survival or recurrence difference for stage 1 patients regardless of treatment or observation. Conclusions: Polyp size does not predict extrauterine disease for USC patients with disease in polyp only or disease in polyp and endometrium. Further study is needed to investigate whether presence of LVI is a prognostic factor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)524-528
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Fingerprint

Polyps
Carcinoma
Uterine Diseases
Odds Ratio
Endometrial Neoplasms
Endometrium
Logistic Models
Observation
Confidence Intervals
Students
Recurrence
Survival

Keywords

  • Lymphovascular invasion
  • Polyp
  • Stage 1A
  • Tumor size
  • Uterine serous cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Malignant Endometrial Polyps in Uterine Serous Carcinoma : The Prognostic Value of Polyp Size and Lymphovascular Invasion. / Ouyang, Chensi; Frimer, Marina; Hou, Laura Y.; Wang, Yanhua; Goldberg, Gary L.; Hou, June Y.

In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 524-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ouyang, Chensi ; Frimer, Marina ; Hou, Laura Y. ; Wang, Yanhua ; Goldberg, Gary L. ; Hou, June Y. / Malignant Endometrial Polyps in Uterine Serous Carcinoma : The Prognostic Value of Polyp Size and Lymphovascular Invasion. In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer. 2018 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 524-528.
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