Major and subthreshold depression among older adults seeking vision rehabilitation services

Amy Horowitz, Joann P. Reinhardt, Gary J. Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Authors examined the potential risk factors of major and subthreshold depression among elderly persons seeking rehabilitation for age-related vision impairment. Methods: Participants (N=584), age 65 and older, with a recent vision loss, were new applicants for rehabilitation services. Subthreshold depression was defined as a depressive syndrome not meeting criteria for a current major depression (i.e., minor depression, major depression in partial remission, dysthymia) or significant depressive symptomatology. Results: Seven percent of respondents had a current major depression, and 26.9% met the criteria for a subthreshold depression. Poorer self-rated health, lower perceived adequacy of social support, decreased feelings of self-efficacy, and a past history of depression increased the odds of both a subthreshold and major depression, versus no depression, but greater functional disability and experiencing a negative life event were significant only for a subthreshold depression. Only a history of past depression was significant in increasing the odds of having a major versus a subthreshold depression. Conclusion: Results highlight similarities in characteristics of, and risk factors for, subthreshold and major depression. Future research is needed to better understand both the trajectory and treatment of subthreshold depression, relative to major depressive disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-187
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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Rehabilitation
Depression
Major Depressive Disorder
Self Efficacy
Depressive Disorder
Social Support
Emotions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Major and subthreshold depression among older adults seeking vision rehabilitation services. / Horowitz, Amy; Reinhardt, Joann P.; Kennedy, Gary J.

In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 13, No. 3, 2005, p. 180-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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