Main partner factors associated with worse adherence to HAART among women in Baltimore, Maryland

A preliminary study

Amy R. Knowlton, Cui Yang, Amy Bohnert, Lawrence Wissow, Geetanjali Chander, Julia H. Arnsten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Compared to US men, US women have worse HAART and HIV health outcomes. The study examined main partner factors associated with women's HAART adherence. The community sample comprised 85% African-Americans; 63% had a main partner and 32% relied on their partner for emotional support. Adherence was highest (92%) among those without a main partner and lowest (57%) among those with an HIV seropositive main partner. In adjusted analysis, adherence was 75% less likely among women with an HIV seropositive main partner and 78% less likely among those relying on their partner for emotional support. Furthermore, HIV seropositive versus other serostatus main partners were most likely to provide medication taking assistance and to be preferred in helping participants deal with HIV, yet were no more likely to be nominated as the most helpful to them. Findings reveal women's perceived unmet support needs from HIV seropositive main partners in this population and the need for interventions to promote their HAART adherence. Seroconcordant couples-focused intervention that enhances mutual support of HAART adherence may be an effective approach to improving women's HAART adherence and reducing US gender disparities in HIV health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1102-1110
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

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Baltimore
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
HIV
health
medication
Health
assistance
African Americans
gender
community
Population

Keywords

  • adherence
  • couples
  • highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)
  • HIV/AIDS
  • main partners
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Main partner factors associated with worse adherence to HAART among women in Baltimore, Maryland : A preliminary study. / Knowlton, Amy R.; Yang, Cui; Bohnert, Amy; Wissow, Lawrence; Chander, Geetanjali; Arnsten, Julia H.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 23, No. 9, 09.2011, p. 1102-1110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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