Low-carbohydrate diets: An update on current research

Judith Wylie-Rosett, Nichola J. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The diabetes and obesity epidemics have stimulated research to assess the benefits and potential risks of low-carbohydrate diets. Carbohydrate comprises less than 45% of calories in carbohydrate-restricted diets, but very low carbohydrate ketogenic diets may restrict carbohydrate to 20 g initially with variability in the carbohydrate level subsequently. Some research suggests that low-carbohydrate diets may achieve better early weight loss than comparison diets higher in carbohydrate. Studies of up to 1 year suggest that weight loss on low-carbohydrate diet is comparable with fat-restricted diets with higher carbohydrate content. Limited research has been conducted to evaluate low-carbohydrate diets in managing type 2 diabetes. Although science continues to advance in this field, current research suggests that low-carbohydrate diets can be a viable option for achieving weight loss and may have beneficial effects on glycemic control, triglyceride levels, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in some patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-404
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Diabetes Reports
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet
Carbohydrates
Research
Weight Loss
Ketogenic Diet
Reducing Diet
Fat-Restricted Diet
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
HDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Low-carbohydrate diets : An update on current research. / Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Davis, Nichola J.

In: Current Diabetes Reports, Vol. 9, No. 5, 2009, p. 396-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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