Longitudinal effect of antiretroviral therapy on markers of hepatic toxicity

Impact of hepatitis C coinfection

Audrey L. French, Lorie Benning, Kathryn Anastos, Michael Augenbraun, Marek Nowicki, Kunthavi Sathasivam, Norah A. Terrault

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To characterize longitudinal hepatic toxicity of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected women with and without hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, we measured alanine and aspartate aminotransferase values among women initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). For 312 HIV/HCV coinfected women who received HAART for a mean of 1.8 years, the prevalence of elevated aminotransferase levels >3 times and >5 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) was low (<12% and <4%, respectively), and the prevalence of elevated aminotransferase levels declined over time. When we analyzed trends in aminotransferase levels according to type of HAART received among HCV-infected and uninfected women, we found that mean aminotransferase levels declined among 539 women receiving therapy with protease inhibitors (decreases of 5.34%-4.23% of the ULN per year; P values for trend of .007-.06), but mean values among 128 women receiving therapy with non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors remained stable (from decreases of 1.65% to increases of 7.57% of the ULN per year; P values of .19-.71). Our findings lend support to assertions that antiretroviral therapy is safe for women with HCV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)402-410
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hepatitis C
Coinfection
Transaminases
Liver
Hepacivirus
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Virus Diseases
Therapeutics
HIV
Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Protease Inhibitors
Alanine Transaminase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Longitudinal effect of antiretroviral therapy on markers of hepatic toxicity : Impact of hepatitis C coinfection. / French, Audrey L.; Benning, Lorie; Anastos, Kathryn; Augenbraun, Michael; Nowicki, Marek; Sathasivam, Kunthavi; Terrault, Norah A.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.08.2004, p. 402-410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

French, AL, Benning, L, Anastos, K, Augenbraun, M, Nowicki, M, Sathasivam, K & Terrault, NA 2004, 'Longitudinal effect of antiretroviral therapy on markers of hepatic toxicity: Impact of hepatitis C coinfection', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 402-410. https://doi.org/10.1086/422142
French, Audrey L. ; Benning, Lorie ; Anastos, Kathryn ; Augenbraun, Michael ; Nowicki, Marek ; Sathasivam, Kunthavi ; Terrault, Norah A. / Longitudinal effect of antiretroviral therapy on markers of hepatic toxicity : Impact of hepatitis C coinfection. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2004 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 402-410.
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