Long-term outcome of children receiving home parenteral nutrition: A 20-year single-center experience in 302 patients

Virginie Colomb, Myriam Dabbas-Tyan, Pierre Taupin, Cécile Talbotec, Y. Révillon, Dominique M. Jan, Sophie De Potter, Anne Marie Gorski-Colin, Michèle Lamor, Karen Herreman, Odile Corriol, Paul Landais, Claude Ricour, Olivier Goulet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

134 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: More information is needed regarding the prognosis of children receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). This article describes 20-year outcome data in children receiving HPN and provides separate profiles for the major pediatric diagnostic subgroups. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This retrospective study included children who started receiving HPN between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 1999, in a single pediatric HPN center. RESULTS: A total of 302 children were recruited, 230 (76%) with primary digestive disorders and 72 (24%) with nonprimary digestive disorders. Median age at HPN onset was 1.5 years. Median duration of HPN was 1.3 years. By January 1, 2000, 54% had weaned from HPN, 26% were still receiving HPN, 16% had died, and 4% had undergone intestinal transplantation. The survival probabilities at 2, 5, 10, and 15 years were 97%, 89%, 81%, and 72%, respectively. The likelihood and cause of death depended on the underlying diagnosis. Nine percent of children with primary digestive disorders died, 24% from their primary disease and 48% from liver disease or sepsis. Children with intractable diarrhea of infancy had the highest mortality rate (25%) and the highest incidence of liver disease (48%; P = 0.0002). Thirty-eight percent of children with primary nondigestive diseases died, 94% from their primary disease and 6% from liver disease or sepsis. CONCLUSIONS: Outcome and survival of children receiving HPN are mainly determined by their underlying diagnosis. Nearly all children with primary digestive disease survive if referred early to an expert center.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-353
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Home Parenteral Nutrition
parenteral feeding
digestive system diseases
liver diseases
Liver Diseases
Sepsis
Pediatrics
Survival
infancy
retrospective studies
prognosis
Cause of Death
diarrhea
Retrospective Studies
Transplantation
death

Keywords

  • Children
  • Complications
  • Intestinal failure
  • Long-term parenteral nutrition
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Histology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Long-term outcome of children receiving home parenteral nutrition : A 20-year single-center experience in 302 patients. / Colomb, Virginie; Dabbas-Tyan, Myriam; Taupin, Pierre; Talbotec, Cécile; Révillon, Y.; Jan, Dominique M.; De Potter, Sophie; Gorski-Colin, Anne Marie; Lamor, Michèle; Herreman, Karen; Corriol, Odile; Landais, Paul; Ricour, Claude; Goulet, Olivier.

In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Vol. 44, No. 3, 03.2007, p. 347-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Colomb, V, Dabbas-Tyan, M, Taupin, P, Talbotec, C, Révillon, Y, Jan, DM, De Potter, S, Gorski-Colin, AM, Lamor, M, Herreman, K, Corriol, O, Landais, P, Ricour, C & Goulet, O 2007, 'Long-term outcome of children receiving home parenteral nutrition: A 20-year single-center experience in 302 patients', Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 347-353. https://doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0b013e31802c6971
Colomb, Virginie ; Dabbas-Tyan, Myriam ; Taupin, Pierre ; Talbotec, Cécile ; Révillon, Y. ; Jan, Dominique M. ; De Potter, Sophie ; Gorski-Colin, Anne Marie ; Lamor, Michèle ; Herreman, Karen ; Corriol, Odile ; Landais, Paul ; Ricour, Claude ; Goulet, Olivier. / Long-term outcome of children receiving home parenteral nutrition : A 20-year single-center experience in 302 patients. In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2007 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 347-353.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: More information is needed regarding the prognosis of children receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). This article describes 20-year outcome data in children receiving HPN and provides separate profiles for the major pediatric diagnostic subgroups. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This retrospective study included children who started receiving HPN between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 1999, in a single pediatric HPN center. RESULTS: A total of 302 children were recruited, 230 (76{\%}) with primary digestive disorders and 72 (24{\%}) with nonprimary digestive disorders. Median age at HPN onset was 1.5 years. Median duration of HPN was 1.3 years. By January 1, 2000, 54{\%} had weaned from HPN, 26{\%} were still receiving HPN, 16{\%} had died, and 4{\%} had undergone intestinal transplantation. The survival probabilities at 2, 5, 10, and 15 years were 97{\%}, 89{\%}, 81{\%}, and 72{\%}, respectively. The likelihood and cause of death depended on the underlying diagnosis. Nine percent of children with primary digestive disorders died, 24{\%} from their primary disease and 48{\%} from liver disease or sepsis. Children with intractable diarrhea of infancy had the highest mortality rate (25{\%}) and the highest incidence of liver disease (48{\%}; P = 0.0002). Thirty-eight percent of children with primary nondigestive diseases died, 94{\%} from their primary disease and 6{\%} from liver disease or sepsis. CONCLUSIONS: Outcome and survival of children receiving HPN are mainly determined by their underlying diagnosis. Nearly all children with primary digestive disease survive if referred early to an expert center.",
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AU - Talbotec, Cécile

AU - Révillon, Y.

AU - Jan, Dominique M.

AU - De Potter, Sophie

AU - Gorski-Colin, Anne Marie

AU - Lamor, Michèle

AU - Herreman, Karen

AU - Corriol, Odile

AU - Landais, Paul

AU - Ricour, Claude

AU - Goulet, Olivier

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N2 - BACKGROUND: More information is needed regarding the prognosis of children receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). This article describes 20-year outcome data in children receiving HPN and provides separate profiles for the major pediatric diagnostic subgroups. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This retrospective study included children who started receiving HPN between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 1999, in a single pediatric HPN center. RESULTS: A total of 302 children were recruited, 230 (76%) with primary digestive disorders and 72 (24%) with nonprimary digestive disorders. Median age at HPN onset was 1.5 years. Median duration of HPN was 1.3 years. By January 1, 2000, 54% had weaned from HPN, 26% were still receiving HPN, 16% had died, and 4% had undergone intestinal transplantation. The survival probabilities at 2, 5, 10, and 15 years were 97%, 89%, 81%, and 72%, respectively. The likelihood and cause of death depended on the underlying diagnosis. Nine percent of children with primary digestive disorders died, 24% from their primary disease and 48% from liver disease or sepsis. Children with intractable diarrhea of infancy had the highest mortality rate (25%) and the highest incidence of liver disease (48%; P = 0.0002). Thirty-eight percent of children with primary nondigestive diseases died, 94% from their primary disease and 6% from liver disease or sepsis. CONCLUSIONS: Outcome and survival of children receiving HPN are mainly determined by their underlying diagnosis. Nearly all children with primary digestive disease survive if referred early to an expert center.

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