Locating the anion-selectivity filter of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) choloride channel

Min Cheung, Myles Akabas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator forms an anion- selective channel; the site and mechanism of charge selectivity is unknown. We previously reported that cysteines substituted, one at a time, for Ile331, Leu333, Arg334, Lys335, Phe337, Ser341, Ile344, Arg347, Thr351, Arg352, and Gln353, in and flanking the sixth membrane-spanning segment (M6), reacted with charged, sulfhydryl-specific, methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents. We inferred that these residues are on the water-accessible surface of the protein and may line the ion channel. We have now measured the voltage- dependence of the reaction rates of the MTS reagents with the accessible, engineered cysteines. By comparing the reaction rates of negatively and positively charged MTS reagents with these cysteines, we measured the extent of anion selectivity from the extracellular end of the channel to eight of the accessible residues. We show that the major site determining anion vs. cation selectivity is near the cytoplasmic end of the channel; it favors anions by ~25-fold and may involve the residues Arg347 and Arg352. From the voltage dependence of the reaction rates, we calculated the electrical distance to the accessible residues. For the residues from Leu333 to Ser341 the electrical distance is not significantly different than zero; it is significantly different than zero for the residues Thr351 to Gln353. The maximum electrical distance measured was 0.6 suggesting that the channel extends more cytoplasmically and may include residues flanking the cytoplasmic end of the M6 segment. Furthermore, the electrical distance calculations indicate that R352C is closer to the extracellular end of the channel than either of the adjacent residues. We speculate that the cytoplasmic end of the M6 segment may loop back into the channel narrowing the lumen and thereby forming both the major resistance to current flow and the anion-selectivity filter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-299
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of General Physiology
Volume109
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator
Anions
Cysteine
Ion Channels
Cations
Membrane Proteins
Membranes
Water
methanethiosulfonate

Keywords

  • charge selectivity
  • ion channel
  • MDR
  • methanethiosulfonate
  • STE6

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Locating the anion-selectivity filter of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) choloride channel. / Cheung, Min; Akabas, Myles.

In: Journal of General Physiology, Vol. 109, No. 3, 03.1997, p. 289-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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