Lifestyle counseling and supplementation with flaxseed or walnuts influence the management of metabolic syndrome

Hongyu Wu, An Pan, Zhijie Yu, Qibin Qi, Ling Lu, Geng Zhang, Danxia Yu, Geng Zong, Yunhua Zhou, Xiafei Chen, Lixin Tang, Ying Feng, Hong Zhou, Xiaolei Chen, Huaixing Li, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Frank B. Hu, Xu Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A healthy lifestyle may ameliorate metabolic syndrome (MetS); however, it remains unclear if incorporating nuts or seeds into lifestyle counseling (LC) has additional benefit. A 3-arm, randomized, controlled trial was conducted among 283 participants screened for MetS using the updated National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for Asian Americans. Participants were assigned to a LC on the AHA guidelines, LC + flaxseed (30 g/d) (LCF), or LC + walnuts (30 g/d) (LCW) group. After the 12-wk intervention, the prevalence of MetS decreased significantly in all groups: -16.9% (LC), -20.2% (LCF), and -16.0% (LCW). The reversion rate of MetS, i.e. those no longer meeting the MetS criteria at 12 wk, was not significantly different among groups (LC group, 21.1%; LCF group, 26.6%; and LCW group, 25.5%). However, the reversion rate of central obesity was higher in the LCF (19.2%; P = 0.008) and LCW (16.0%; P = 0.04) groups than in the LC group (6.3%). Most of the metabolic variables (weight, waist circumference, serum glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein (Apo) B, ApoE, and blood pressure) were significantly reduced from baseline in all 3 groups. However, the severity of MetS, presented as the mean count of MetS components, was significantly reduced in the LCW group compared with the LC group among participants with confirmed MetS at baseline (P = 0.045). Our results suggest that a low-intensity lifestyle education program is effective in MetS management. Flaxseed and walnut supplementation may ameliorate central obesity. Further studies with larger sample sizes and of longer duration are needed to examine the role of these foods in the prevention and management of MetS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1937-1942
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume140
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Juglans
Flax
Life Style
Counseling
Abdominal Obesity
Cholesterol
Education
Nuts
Asian Americans
Apolipoproteins B
Waist Circumference
Apolipoproteins E
Sample Size
LDL Cholesterol
Seeds
Randomized Controlled Trials
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lifestyle counseling and supplementation with flaxseed or walnuts influence the management of metabolic syndrome. / Wu, Hongyu; Pan, An; Yu, Zhijie; Qi, Qibin; Lu, Ling; Zhang, Geng; Yu, Danxia; Zong, Geng; Zhou, Yunhua; Chen, Xiafei; Tang, Lixin; Feng, Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Xiaolei; Li, Huaixing; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Hu, Frank B.; Lin, Xu.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 140, No. 11, 11.2010, p. 1937-1942.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, H, Pan, A, Yu, Z, Qi, Q, Lu, L, Zhang, G, Yu, D, Zong, G, Zhou, Y, Chen, X, Tang, L, Feng, Y, Zhou, H, Chen, X, Li, H, Demark-Wahnefried, W, Hu, FB & Lin, X 2010, 'Lifestyle counseling and supplementation with flaxseed or walnuts influence the management of metabolic syndrome', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 140, no. 11, pp. 1937-1942. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.110.126300
Wu, Hongyu ; Pan, An ; Yu, Zhijie ; Qi, Qibin ; Lu, Ling ; Zhang, Geng ; Yu, Danxia ; Zong, Geng ; Zhou, Yunhua ; Chen, Xiafei ; Tang, Lixin ; Feng, Ying ; Zhou, Hong ; Chen, Xiaolei ; Li, Huaixing ; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy ; Hu, Frank B. ; Lin, Xu. / Lifestyle counseling and supplementation with flaxseed or walnuts influence the management of metabolic syndrome. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 140, No. 11. pp. 1937-1942.
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AU - Yu, Danxia

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