Lack of effectiveness of a low-sodium/high-potassium diet in reducing antihypertensive medication requirements in overweight persons with mild hypertension

Barry R. Davis, Albert Oberman, M. Donald Blaufox, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Neal Zimbaldi, Kent Kirchner, Judith Wylie-Rosett, Herbert G. Langford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Trial of Antihypertensive Interventions and Management (TAIM) was a multicenter randomized drug (double-blind, placebo-controlled)-diet trial. One objective of TAIM was to assess the long-term ability of a low-sodium/high-potassium (Na+ ↓ /K+ ↑) diet to maintain blood pressure control in persons at 110% to 160% ideal weight with diastolic blood pressure from 90 to 100 mm Hg who were on no drugs or on low-dose monotherapy. Participants, 56% men and 33% black, were randomized to usual diet (n = 296) or to Na+ ↓ / K+ t diet (n = 291) and within each diet group to placebo, 25 mg/day chlorthalidone, or 50 mg/day atenolol. Treatment failure was defined as lack of blood pressure control requiring additional drugs according to specified criteria. At baseline, the mean value for age was 48 years; blood pressure, 143/93 mm Hg; weight, 88 kg; and 24-h urinary sodium and potassium excretion rates, 133 and 57 mmol/day, respectively. At 3 years, the net difference in 24-h urinary sodium/potassium excretion rates between the Na+ ↓ /K+ ↑ and the usual diet groups was -30 and +11 mmol/L/day. The relative risk of treatment failure for Na+ ↓ /K+ ↑ compared to usual diet by proportional hazards regression was 0.95 (P = .71). This study provides no support for the sole use of a low-sodium/high-potassium diet as a practical therapeutic strategy in maintaining blood pressure control in the moderately obese. This research was supported by grants (HL-40072, HL-30171, HL-24369, HL-30163, and HL-41445) from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)926-932
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reducing Diet
Antihypertensive Agents
Potassium
Sodium
Diet
Hypertension
Blood Pressure
Treatment Failure
Placebos
Chlorthalidone
Pharmaceutical Preparations
United States Dept. of Health and Human Services
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Weights and Measures
Atenolol
Organized Financing
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)

Keywords

  • diet therapy
  • Mild hypertension
  • pharmacologic therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Lack of effectiveness of a low-sodium/high-potassium diet in reducing antihypertensive medication requirements in overweight persons with mild hypertension. / Davis, Barry R.; Oberman, Albert; Blaufox, M. Donald; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Zimbaldi, Neal; Kirchner, Kent; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Langford, Herbert G.

In: American Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 7, No. 10, 10.1994, p. 926-932.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davis, Barry R. ; Oberman, Albert ; Blaufox, M. Donald ; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia ; Zimbaldi, Neal ; Kirchner, Kent ; Wylie-Rosett, Judith ; Langford, Herbert G. / Lack of effectiveness of a low-sodium/high-potassium diet in reducing antihypertensive medication requirements in overweight persons with mild hypertension. In: American Journal of Hypertension. 1994 ; Vol. 7, No. 10. pp. 926-932.
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