Intersectionality of internalized HIV stigma and internalized substance use stigma

Implications for depressive symptoms

Valerie A. Earnshaw, Laramie R. Smith, Chinazo O. Cunningham, Michael M. Copenhaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We adopted an intersectionality framework and examined whether the relationship between internalized HIV stigma and depressive symptoms is moderated by internalized substance use stigma. A total of 85 people living with HIV with a history of substance use in the Bronx, New York, completed a survey. Results revealed evidence of moderation: Participants who internalized HIV stigma experienced greater depressive symptoms only if they also internalized substance use stigma. Researchers should examine stigma associated with multiple socially devalued characteristics to best understand how stigma impacts mental health among people living with HIV. Healthcare providers should address stigma associated with the full range of socially devalued characteristics with which people living with HIV live.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1083-1089
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 4 2015

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Keywords

  • depressive symptoms
  • HIV
  • internalized stigma
  • intersectionality
  • substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Intersectionality of internalized HIV stigma and internalized substance use stigma : Implications for depressive symptoms. / Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Smith, Laramie R.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.; Copenhaver, Michael M.

In: Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 20, No. 8, 04.08.2015, p. 1083-1089.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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