Inhibition of acute in vivo human immunodeficiency virus infection by human interleukin 10 treatment of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver

Tobias R. Kollmann, Massimo Pettoello-Mantovani, Nikos F. Katopodis, Moshe Hachamovitch, Arye Rubinstein, Ana Kim, Harris Goldstein

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Abstract

To improve the usefulness of in vivo models for the investigation of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we modified the construction of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver (thy/liv-SCID-hu mice) so that the peripheral blood of the mice contained significant numbers of human monocytes and T cells. After inoculation with HIV-159, a primary patient isolate capable of infecting monocytes and T cells, the modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice developed disseminated HIV infection that was associated with plasma viremia. The development of plasma viremia and HIV infection in thy/liv-SCID-hu mice inoculated with HIV-159 was inhibited by acute treatment with human interleukin (IL) 10 but not with human IL-12. The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice were responsive in vivo to treatment with exogenous cytokines. Human interferon γ expression in the circulating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was induced by treatment with IL-12 and inhibited by treatment with IL-10. Thus, these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice should prove to be a valuable in vivo model for examining the role of immunomodulatory therapy in modifying HIV infection. Furthermore, our demonstration of the in vivo inhibitory effect of IL-10 on acute HIV infection suggests that further studies may be warranted to evaluate whether there is a role for IL-10 therapy in preventing HIV infection in individuals soon after exposure to HIV such as for children born to HIV-infected mothers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3126-3131
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume93
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 1996

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SCID Mice
Virus Diseases
Interleukin-10
Thymus Gland
HIV
Liver
Therapeutics
Viremia
Interleukin-12
Monocytes
Blood Cells
T-Lymphocytes
Immunomodulation
Interferons
Mothers
Cytokines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

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Inhibition of acute in vivo human immunodeficiency virus infection by human interleukin 10 treatment of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver. / Kollmann, Tobias R.; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Katopodis, Nikos F.; Hachamovitch, Moshe; Rubinstein, Arye; Kim, Ana; Goldstein, Harris.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 93, No. 7, 02.04.1996, p. 3126-3131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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