Infants and children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Placement in adoption and foster care

S. A. Plotkin, L. Z. Cooper, H. E. Evans, N. C. Fost, G. Merenstein, S. Kenneth Schonberg, G. B. Scott, M. N. Sklaire, E. H. Wender, J. R. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from infected mothers to their infants has been well established. The majority of infants so infected are born to women who have acquired HIV through IV drug use or through sexual contact with IV drug-using partners. Some of these mothers are unable to care for their infants. In addition, many infected mothers become serioussly ill or die, leaving children who must be cared for by others. Thus, many infants and children who are infected or are at high risk for infection may require placement in an adoptive or foster care setting. The HIV-infected infant or child places a serious burden on any family. This burden, when anticipated, may make adoption and foster care placement exceedingly difficult. However, such family-based care is clearly in the best interest of the child.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)609-612
Number of pages4
JournalPediatrics
Volume83
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Mothers
HIV
Infant Care
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Plotkin, S. A., Cooper, L. Z., Evans, H. E., Fost, N. C., Merenstein, G., Schonberg, S. K., ... Allen, J. R. (1989). Infants and children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Placement in adoption and foster care. Pediatrics, 83(4), 609-612.

Infants and children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome : Placement in adoption and foster care. / Plotkin, S. A.; Cooper, L. Z.; Evans, H. E.; Fost, N. C.; Merenstein, G.; Schonberg, S. Kenneth; Scott, G. B.; Sklaire, M. N.; Wender, E. H.; Allen, J. R.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 83, No. 4, 1989, p. 609-612.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Plotkin, SA, Cooper, LZ, Evans, HE, Fost, NC, Merenstein, G, Schonberg, SK, Scott, GB, Sklaire, MN, Wender, EH & Allen, JR 1989, 'Infants and children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Placement in adoption and foster care', Pediatrics, vol. 83, no. 4, pp. 609-612.
Plotkin SA, Cooper LZ, Evans HE, Fost NC, Merenstein G, Schonberg SK et al. Infants and children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Placement in adoption and foster care. Pediatrics. 1989;83(4):609-612.
Plotkin, S. A. ; Cooper, L. Z. ; Evans, H. E. ; Fost, N. C. ; Merenstein, G. ; Schonberg, S. Kenneth ; Scott, G. B. ; Sklaire, M. N. ; Wender, E. H. ; Allen, J. R. / Infants and children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome : Placement in adoption and foster care. In: Pediatrics. 1989 ; Vol. 83, No. 4. pp. 609-612.
@article{09d25e9d885c4437b7dfe76c02123dd8,
title = "Infants and children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Placement in adoption and foster care",
abstract = "The transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from infected mothers to their infants has been well established. The majority of infants so infected are born to women who have acquired HIV through IV drug use or through sexual contact with IV drug-using partners. Some of these mothers are unable to care for their infants. In addition, many infected mothers become serioussly ill or die, leaving children who must be cared for by others. Thus, many infants and children who are infected or are at high risk for infection may require placement in an adoptive or foster care setting. The HIV-infected infant or child places a serious burden on any family. This burden, when anticipated, may make adoption and foster care placement exceedingly difficult. However, such family-based care is clearly in the best interest of the child.",
author = "Plotkin, {S. A.} and Cooper, {L. Z.} and Evans, {H. E.} and Fost, {N. C.} and G. Merenstein and Schonberg, {S. Kenneth} and Scott, {G. B.} and Sklaire, {M. N.} and Wender, {E. H.} and Allen, {J. R.}",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "83",
pages = "609--612",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infants and children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

T2 - Placement in adoption and foster care

AU - Plotkin, S. A.

AU - Cooper, L. Z.

AU - Evans, H. E.

AU - Fost, N. C.

AU - Merenstein, G.

AU - Schonberg, S. Kenneth

AU - Scott, G. B.

AU - Sklaire, M. N.

AU - Wender, E. H.

AU - Allen, J. R.

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - The transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from infected mothers to their infants has been well established. The majority of infants so infected are born to women who have acquired HIV through IV drug use or through sexual contact with IV drug-using partners. Some of these mothers are unable to care for their infants. In addition, many infected mothers become serioussly ill or die, leaving children who must be cared for by others. Thus, many infants and children who are infected or are at high risk for infection may require placement in an adoptive or foster care setting. The HIV-infected infant or child places a serious burden on any family. This burden, when anticipated, may make adoption and foster care placement exceedingly difficult. However, such family-based care is clearly in the best interest of the child.

AB - The transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from infected mothers to their infants has been well established. The majority of infants so infected are born to women who have acquired HIV through IV drug use or through sexual contact with IV drug-using partners. Some of these mothers are unable to care for their infants. In addition, many infected mothers become serioussly ill or die, leaving children who must be cared for by others. Thus, many infants and children who are infected or are at high risk for infection may require placement in an adoptive or foster care setting. The HIV-infected infant or child places a serious burden on any family. This burden, when anticipated, may make adoption and foster care placement exceedingly difficult. However, such family-based care is clearly in the best interest of the child.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024507118&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024507118&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0024507118

VL - 83

SP - 609

EP - 612

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 4

ER -