In vivo guided numerical modeling of pulmonary venous waveforms: A paradigm for applied physiology research

Michael S. Firstenberg, Mario J. Garcia, Nicholas Smedira, Neil L. Greenberg, David L. Prior, Gregory M. Scalia, James D. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

The determination of pulmonary venous velocities from pulsed Doppler echocardiography is valuable for the assessment of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, yet little is known regarding the relationship between actual pressure gradients and measured velocities. Combining results of in vivo experiments and numerical modeling, a linear relationship was observed between actual pulmonary venous - left atrial pressure gradients and measured velocities (convective forces) measured using pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Strong model correlations were observed for the systolic (y = 0.20x-0.13, r = 0.97,) and diastolic (y = 0.25x-0.34, r = 0.99) phases of the pulmonary venous waveform. In vivo results were similar for the systolic (y = 0.234x+0.01x, r = 0.82) and diastolic (y = 0.22x+0.09, r = 0.81) phases. Modeling, combined with in vivo experiments can complement each other in understanding complex physiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-16
Number of pages4
JournalComputers in Cardiology
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999
Externally publishedYes
EventThe 26th Annual Meeting: Computers in Cardiology 1999 - Hannover, Ger
Duration: Sep 26 1999Sep 29 1999

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Firstenberg, M. S., Garcia, M. J., Smedira, N., Greenberg, N. L., Prior, D. L., Scalia, G. M., & Thomas, J. D. (1999). In vivo guided numerical modeling of pulmonary venous waveforms: A paradigm for applied physiology research. Computers in Cardiology, 13-16.