Image-guided Ex vivo liver ablation by unfocused ultrasound using passive cavitation detection

Vasant A. Salgaonkar, Chandra Priya Karunakaran, John A. Besse, Grace Heinlein, Saurabh Datta, Christy K. Holland, T. Douglas Mast

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ablation therapy is used as an alternative to surgical resection of hepatic tumors. In ablation, tumors are destroyed through heating by RF current, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), or other energy sources. Ablation can be performed with a linear array transducer delivering unfocused intense ultrasound (>10 W/cm2). This allows simultaneous treatment and imaging, a feature uncommon in RF ablation. Unfocused ultrasound can also enable faster bulk tissue ablation than HIFU. In the experiments reported here, a 32-element linear array transducer with a 49 mm aperture delivers 3.1 MHz continuous wave unfocused ultrasound at amplitudes 0.7-1.4 MPa during the therapy cycle. It also operates in pulse-echo mode to capture B-scan images. Ex-vivo fresh bovine liver tissue placed in degassed saline is exposed to continuous wave ultrasound interleaved with brief pulsed ultrasound imaging cycles. Tissue exposures range between 5 to 20 minutes. The following measurements are made at intervals of 1 to 3 seconds: tissue temperature with a needle thermocouple, acoustic emissions with a 1 MHz passive unfocused detector, and tissue echogenicity from image brightness. Passively detected acoustic emissions are used to quantify cavitation activity in the ablation experiments presented here. As severity and extent of tissue ablation are related to temperature, this paper will statistically model temperature as a function of tissue echogenicity and cavitation. The latter two quantities can potentially be monitored noninvasively and used as a surrogate for temperature, enabling improved image guidance and control of ultrasound ablation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThermal Treatment of Tissue
Subtitle of host publicationEnergy Delivery and Assessment IV
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 2007
Externally publishedYes
EventThermal Treatment of Tissue: Energy Delivery and Assessment IV - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 20 2007Jan 21 2007

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume6440
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Conference

ConferenceThermal Treatment of Tissue: Energy Delivery and Assessment IV
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/20/071/21/07

Fingerprint

Ablation
cavitation flow
liver
Cavitation
Liver
ablation
Ultrasonics
Tissue
Temperature
Transducers
Acoustics
acoustic emission
linear arrays
Acoustic emissions
High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation
continuous radiation
Tumors
therapy
transducers
tumors

Keywords

  • Cavitation
  • Logistic regression
  • Monitoring
  • Statistical modeling
  • Temperature
  • Ultrasound ablation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Salgaonkar, V. A., Karunakaran, C. P., Besse, J. A., Heinlein, G., Datta, S., Holland, C. K., & Mast, T. D. (2007). Image-guided Ex vivo liver ablation by unfocused ultrasound using passive cavitation detection. In Thermal Treatment of Tissue: Energy Delivery and Assessment IV [64400Q] (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 6440). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.701029

Image-guided Ex vivo liver ablation by unfocused ultrasound using passive cavitation detection. / Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Karunakaran, Chandra Priya; Besse, John A.; Heinlein, Grace; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas.

Thermal Treatment of Tissue: Energy Delivery and Assessment IV. 2007. 64400Q (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 6440).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Salgaonkar, VA, Karunakaran, CP, Besse, JA, Heinlein, G, Datta, S, Holland, CK & Mast, TD 2007, Image-guided Ex vivo liver ablation by unfocused ultrasound using passive cavitation detection. in Thermal Treatment of Tissue: Energy Delivery and Assessment IV., 64400Q, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE, vol. 6440, Thermal Treatment of Tissue: Energy Delivery and Assessment IV, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/20/07. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.701029
Salgaonkar VA, Karunakaran CP, Besse JA, Heinlein G, Datta S, Holland CK et al. Image-guided Ex vivo liver ablation by unfocused ultrasound using passive cavitation detection. In Thermal Treatment of Tissue: Energy Delivery and Assessment IV. 2007. 64400Q. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.701029
Salgaonkar, Vasant A. ; Karunakaran, Chandra Priya ; Besse, John A. ; Heinlein, Grace ; Datta, Saurabh ; Holland, Christy K. ; Mast, T. Douglas. / Image-guided Ex vivo liver ablation by unfocused ultrasound using passive cavitation detection. Thermal Treatment of Tissue: Energy Delivery and Assessment IV. 2007. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE).
@inproceedings{a52e3d2c48eb4a00a81a2baac5e427d2,
title = "Image-guided Ex vivo liver ablation by unfocused ultrasound using passive cavitation detection",
abstract = "Ablation therapy is used as an alternative to surgical resection of hepatic tumors. In ablation, tumors are destroyed through heating by RF current, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), or other energy sources. Ablation can be performed with a linear array transducer delivering unfocused intense ultrasound (>10 W/cm2). This allows simultaneous treatment and imaging, a feature uncommon in RF ablation. Unfocused ultrasound can also enable faster bulk tissue ablation than HIFU. In the experiments reported here, a 32-element linear array transducer with a 49 mm aperture delivers 3.1 MHz continuous wave unfocused ultrasound at amplitudes 0.7-1.4 MPa during the therapy cycle. It also operates in pulse-echo mode to capture B-scan images. Ex-vivo fresh bovine liver tissue placed in degassed saline is exposed to continuous wave ultrasound interleaved with brief pulsed ultrasound imaging cycles. Tissue exposures range between 5 to 20 minutes. The following measurements are made at intervals of 1 to 3 seconds: tissue temperature with a needle thermocouple, acoustic emissions with a 1 MHz passive unfocused detector, and tissue echogenicity from image brightness. Passively detected acoustic emissions are used to quantify cavitation activity in the ablation experiments presented here. As severity and extent of tissue ablation are related to temperature, this paper will statistically model temperature as a function of tissue echogenicity and cavitation. The latter two quantities can potentially be monitored noninvasively and used as a surrogate for temperature, enabling improved image guidance and control of ultrasound ablation.",
keywords = "Cavitation, Logistic regression, Monitoring, Statistical modeling, Temperature, Ultrasound ablation",
author = "Salgaonkar, {Vasant A.} and Karunakaran, {Chandra Priya} and Besse, {John A.} and Grace Heinlein and Saurabh Datta and Holland, {Christy K.} and Mast, {T. Douglas}",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1117/12.701029",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "0819465534",
series = "Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE",
booktitle = "Thermal Treatment of Tissue",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Image-guided Ex vivo liver ablation by unfocused ultrasound using passive cavitation detection

AU - Salgaonkar, Vasant A.

AU - Karunakaran, Chandra Priya

AU - Besse, John A.

AU - Heinlein, Grace

AU - Datta, Saurabh

AU - Holland, Christy K.

AU - Mast, T. Douglas

PY - 2007/8/31

Y1 - 2007/8/31

N2 - Ablation therapy is used as an alternative to surgical resection of hepatic tumors. In ablation, tumors are destroyed through heating by RF current, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), or other energy sources. Ablation can be performed with a linear array transducer delivering unfocused intense ultrasound (>10 W/cm2). This allows simultaneous treatment and imaging, a feature uncommon in RF ablation. Unfocused ultrasound can also enable faster bulk tissue ablation than HIFU. In the experiments reported here, a 32-element linear array transducer with a 49 mm aperture delivers 3.1 MHz continuous wave unfocused ultrasound at amplitudes 0.7-1.4 MPa during the therapy cycle. It also operates in pulse-echo mode to capture B-scan images. Ex-vivo fresh bovine liver tissue placed in degassed saline is exposed to continuous wave ultrasound interleaved with brief pulsed ultrasound imaging cycles. Tissue exposures range between 5 to 20 minutes. The following measurements are made at intervals of 1 to 3 seconds: tissue temperature with a needle thermocouple, acoustic emissions with a 1 MHz passive unfocused detector, and tissue echogenicity from image brightness. Passively detected acoustic emissions are used to quantify cavitation activity in the ablation experiments presented here. As severity and extent of tissue ablation are related to temperature, this paper will statistically model temperature as a function of tissue echogenicity and cavitation. The latter two quantities can potentially be monitored noninvasively and used as a surrogate for temperature, enabling improved image guidance and control of ultrasound ablation.

AB - Ablation therapy is used as an alternative to surgical resection of hepatic tumors. In ablation, tumors are destroyed through heating by RF current, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), or other energy sources. Ablation can be performed with a linear array transducer delivering unfocused intense ultrasound (>10 W/cm2). This allows simultaneous treatment and imaging, a feature uncommon in RF ablation. Unfocused ultrasound can also enable faster bulk tissue ablation than HIFU. In the experiments reported here, a 32-element linear array transducer with a 49 mm aperture delivers 3.1 MHz continuous wave unfocused ultrasound at amplitudes 0.7-1.4 MPa during the therapy cycle. It also operates in pulse-echo mode to capture B-scan images. Ex-vivo fresh bovine liver tissue placed in degassed saline is exposed to continuous wave ultrasound interleaved with brief pulsed ultrasound imaging cycles. Tissue exposures range between 5 to 20 minutes. The following measurements are made at intervals of 1 to 3 seconds: tissue temperature with a needle thermocouple, acoustic emissions with a 1 MHz passive unfocused detector, and tissue echogenicity from image brightness. Passively detected acoustic emissions are used to quantify cavitation activity in the ablation experiments presented here. As severity and extent of tissue ablation are related to temperature, this paper will statistically model temperature as a function of tissue echogenicity and cavitation. The latter two quantities can potentially be monitored noninvasively and used as a surrogate for temperature, enabling improved image guidance and control of ultrasound ablation.

KW - Cavitation

KW - Logistic regression

KW - Monitoring

KW - Statistical modeling

KW - Temperature

KW - Ultrasound ablation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548244974&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548244974&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1117/12.701029

DO - 10.1117/12.701029

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:34548244974

SN - 0819465534

SN - 9780819465535

T3 - Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE

BT - Thermal Treatment of Tissue

ER -