Host cell-dependent alterations in envelope components of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions

Lisa Bastiani, Suman Laal, Mimi Kim, Susan Zolla-Pazner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

In addition to gp41 and gp120, an array of cell adhesion molecules is present on the envelope of human immunodeficieney virus type 1 (HIV-1). To examine the role of the host cell in the acquisition of these molecules by virions, both laboratory-adapted and primary isolates were sequentially passaged into different host cells. Viruses obtained from the various host cells were examined for the presence of 10 different cell-derived molecules by a virus binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Virus progeny raised in peripheral blood mononuclear cells expressed most of the adhesion molecules tested, with the level of LFA-1 being the highest. When viruses were passaged into CEM-SS or SupT1 cells, the expression of most of the adhesion molecules on the virus envelope was lost. In contrast, when viruses were passaged into MT2 cells, the virus progeny bore high levels of LFA-3, ICAM-1, and major histocompatibility complex classes I and II. These studies demonstrate for the first time the host cell dependence of the adhesion molecule profile present on the envelope of primary isolates of HIV-1. The presence of several adhesion molecules that have not previously been identified as components of the envelope of either laboratory or primary isolates is also described. In addition, we show that the adhesion molecule profile of the virions is acquired, or lost, within one passage and is maintained with subsequent passages in the same cell type.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3444-3450
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of virology
Volume71
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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