History of Solitary Confinement Is Associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms among Individuals Recently Released from Prison

Transitions Clinic Network

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study assessed the relationship between solitary confinement and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a cohort of recently released former prisoners. The cross-sectional design utilized baseline data from the Transitions Clinic Network, a multi-site prospective longitudinal cohort study of post-incarceration medical care. Our main independent variable was self-reported solitary confinement during the participants’ most recent incarceration; the dependent variable was the presence of PTSD symptoms determined by primary care (PC)-PTSD screening when participants initiated primary care in the community. We used multivariable logistic regression to adjust for potential confounders, such as prior mental health conditions, age, and gender. Among 119 participants, 43% had a history of solitary confinement and 28% screened positive for PTSD symptoms. Those who reported a history of solitary confinement were more likely to report PTSD symptoms than those without solitary confinement (43 vs. 16%, p < 0.01). In multivariable logistic regression, a history of solitary confinement (OR = 3.93, 95% CI 1.57–9.83) and chronic mental health conditions (OR = 4.04, 95% CI 1.52–10.68) were significantly associated with a positive PTSD screen after adjustment for the potential confounders. Experiencing solitary confinement was significantly associated with PTSD symptoms among individuals accessing primary care following release from prison. Larger studies should confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Urban Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 9 2017

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Prisons
posttraumatic stress disorder
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
correctional institution
history
Primary Health Care
Mental Health
Logistic Models
logistics
mental health
release from prison
regression
Prisoners
prisoner
medical care
Longitudinal Studies
Cohort Studies
gender
community

Keywords

  • Incarceration
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder screening
  • Solitary confinement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

History of Solitary Confinement Is Associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms among Individuals Recently Released from Prison. / Transitions Clinic Network.

In: Journal of Urban Health, 09.03.2017, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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