Hepatitis B vaccination practices in hospital newborn nurseries before and after changes in vaccination recommendations

S. J. Clark, M. D. Cabana, T. Malik, H. Yusuf, G. L. Freed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Routine use of hepatitis B vaccine for low-risk newborns was suspended on July 7, 1999, because of concern about the potential risk of thimerosal, a mercury-containing vaccine preservative. Reinstatement of the birth dose was recommended when a thimerosal-free vaccine became available. Objective: To explore changes in hepatitis B vaccination practices for newborns related to the revised recommendations for low-risk infants (in this study, the terms newborn and infant are used interchangeably). Design: A telephone survey of a random sample of 1000 US hospitals. Participants: Nurse managers, nursery directors, and staff nurses of the newborn nurseries. Main Outcome Measures: Nursery vaccination practices before and after July 7, 1999, and the availability and use of thimerosal-free vaccine. Results: Interviews were conducted with 773 (87%) of 886 eligible hospitals. Before July 7, 1999, 78% of the hospitals reported vaccination practices that were consistent with recommendations at that time, although only 47% vaccinated all low-risk infants at birth. After July 7, 1999, almost all hospitals discontinued vaccination of low-risk infants, in accordance with the recommendation change; however, there was a 6-fold increase in the number of hospitals that were not vaccinating all high-risk infants. After the introduction of thimerosal-free vaccine, only 39% of the hospitals reported vaccinating all low-risk infants. Conclusions: Most hospital nurseries altered their newborn hepatitis B vaccination practices consistent with changes in national recommendations. However, unintended consequences included the failure of some hospitals to continue vaccinating all high-risk infants and the delay in reintroducing vaccination for low-risk newborns after the introduction of a thimerosal-free vaccine. Assessments of the appropriateness of this country's response to the threat of thimerosal in vaccines should consider these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-920
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume155
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Hospital Nurseries
Hepatitis B
Thimerosal
Vaccination
Newborn Infant
Vaccines
Nurseries
Parturition
Nurse Administrators
Hepatitis B Vaccines
Mercury
Telephone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Hepatitis B vaccination practices in hospital newborn nurseries before and after changes in vaccination recommendations. / Clark, S. J.; Cabana, M. D.; Malik, T.; Yusuf, H.; Freed, G. L.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 155, No. 8, 01.01.2001, p. 915-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Routine use of hepatitis B vaccine for low-risk newborns was suspended on July 7, 1999, because of concern about the potential risk of thimerosal, a mercury-containing vaccine preservative. Reinstatement of the birth dose was recommended when a thimerosal-free vaccine became available. Objective: To explore changes in hepatitis B vaccination practices for newborns related to the revised recommendations for low-risk infants (in this study, the terms newborn and infant are used interchangeably). Design: A telephone survey of a random sample of 1000 US hospitals. Participants: Nurse managers, nursery directors, and staff nurses of the newborn nurseries. Main Outcome Measures: Nursery vaccination practices before and after July 7, 1999, and the availability and use of thimerosal-free vaccine. Results: Interviews were conducted with 773 (87{\%}) of 886 eligible hospitals. Before July 7, 1999, 78{\%} of the hospitals reported vaccination practices that were consistent with recommendations at that time, although only 47{\%} vaccinated all low-risk infants at birth. After July 7, 1999, almost all hospitals discontinued vaccination of low-risk infants, in accordance with the recommendation change; however, there was a 6-fold increase in the number of hospitals that were not vaccinating all high-risk infants. After the introduction of thimerosal-free vaccine, only 39{\%} of the hospitals reported vaccinating all low-risk infants. Conclusions: Most hospital nurseries altered their newborn hepatitis B vaccination practices consistent with changes in national recommendations. However, unintended consequences included the failure of some hospitals to continue vaccinating all high-risk infants and the delay in reintroducing vaccination for low-risk newborns after the introduction of a thimerosal-free vaccine. Assessments of the appropriateness of this country's response to the threat of thimerosal in vaccines should consider these findings.",
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