Healthcare use among older primary care patients with minor depression

Yolonda R. Pickett, Samiran Ghosh, Anne Rohs, Gary J. Kennedy, Martha L. Bruce, Jeffrey M. Lyness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the rate of healthcare utilization for older primary care patients by depression status. Design: Cross-sectional data analysis. Setting: Primary care practices, western New York state. Participants: 753 patients aged 65 years and older. Measures: Diagnostic depression categories were determined using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). The Cornell Services Index (CSI) measured outpatient medical visits. Demographic, clinical, and functional variables were obtained from medical records and interview data. Results: 41.23% had subsyndromal or minor depression (M/SSD) and 53.15% had no depression. The unadjusted mean number of outpatient medical visits was greater in those with M/SSD (3.96 visits within 3 months) compared to those without depression (2.84), with a significant difference after adjusting for demographic, functional, and clinical factors. Conclusion: Those with M/SSD had higher rates of healthcare utilization compared with those without depressive symptoms. Future research should examine whether interventions for older adults with M/SSD reduce healthcare utilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-210
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

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Keywords

  • Geriatric
  • Healthcare utilization
  • Minor depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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