Health information systems in small practices: Improving the delivery of clinical preventive services

Sarah C. Shih, Colleen M. McCullough, Jason J. Wang, Jesse Singer, Amanda S. Parsons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite strong evidence that clinical preventive services (CPS) reduce morbidity and mortality, CPS performance has not improved in adult primary care. In addition to implementing electronic health records (EHRs), key factors for improving CPS include providing actionable information at the point of care, technical support staff, and quality-improvement assistance. These resources are not typically available in small practices. Purpose: Estimate the impact on CPS delivery after a software upgrade to embed a clinical decision support system and practice-level quality-improvement support services. Methods: Practices were recruited from the Primary Care Information Project, a citywide initiative assisting practices adopt health information technology. Data were collected in 2009 and 2010, and analyses were conducted in 2010 and 2011. Across two time periods, receipt of CPS was calculated for 56 practices. Period 1 measured CPS delivery 237 months following implementation of an EHR. Period 2 measured CPS delivery within the first 6 months after an EHR software upgrade. Results: Substantial increases in the delivery of selected CPS were observed after the EHR software upgrades. Blood pressure control for patients with hypertension increased from 46.0% to 54.8%. Breast cancer screening, recorded BMI, and HbA1c testing for patients with diabetes also increased. More than half of the practices increased their patients' blood pressure control, recorded BMI, breast cancer screening, and HbA1c screening by

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-609
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Health Information Systems
Electronic Health Records
Software
Quality Improvement
Early Detection of Cancer
Primary Health Care
Point-of-Care Systems
Clinical Decision Support Systems
Breast Neoplasms
Blood Pressure
Medical Informatics
Hypertension
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Health information systems in small practices : Improving the delivery of clinical preventive services. / Shih, Sarah C.; McCullough, Colleen M.; Wang, Jason J.; Singer, Jesse; Parsons, Amanda S.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 41, No. 6, 12.2011, p. 603-609.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shih, Sarah C. ; McCullough, Colleen M. ; Wang, Jason J. ; Singer, Jesse ; Parsons, Amanda S. / Health information systems in small practices : Improving the delivery of clinical preventive services. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 603-609.
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