Global, Regional, and National Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived With Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life-Years for 29 Cancer Groups, 1990 to 2016: A Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study

Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration

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Abstract

Importance: The increasing burden due to cancer and other noncommunicable diseases poses a threat to human development, which has resulted in global political commitments reflected in the Sustainable Development Goals as well as the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Action Plan on Non-Communicable Diseases. To determine if these commitments have resulted in improved cancer control, quantitative assessments of the cancer burden are required. Objective: To assess the burden for 29 cancer groups over time to provide a framework for policy discussion, resource allocation, and research focus. Evidence Review: Cancer incidence, mortality, years lived with disability, years of life lost, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were evaluated for 195 countries and territories by age and sex using the Global Burden of Disease study estimation methods. Levels and trends were analyzed over time, as well as by the Sociodemographic Index (SDI). Changes in incident cases were categorized by changes due to epidemiological vs demographic transition. Findings: In 2016, there were 17.2 million cancer cases worldwide and 8.9 million deaths. Cancer cases increased by 28% between 2006 and 2016. The smallest increase was seen in high SDI countries. Globally, population aging contributed 17%; population growth, 12%; and changes in age-specific rates, -1% to this change. The most common incident cancer globally for men was prostate cancer (1.4 million cases). The leading cause of cancer deaths and DALYs was tracheal, bronchus, and lung cancer (1.2 million deaths and 25.4 million DALYs). For women, the most common incident cancer and the leading cause of cancer deaths and DALYs was breast cancer (1.7 million incident cases, 535 000 deaths, and 14.9 million DALYs). In 2016, cancer caused 213.2 million DALYs globally for both sexes combined. Between 2006 and 2016, the average annual age-standardized incidence rates for all cancers combined increased in 130 of 195 countries or territories, and the average annual age-standardized death rates decreased within that timeframe in 143 of 195 countries or territories. Conclusions and Relevance: Large disparities exist between countries in cancer incidence, deaths, and associated disability. Scaling up cancer prevention and ensuring universal access to cancer care are required for health equity and to fulfill the global commitments for noncommunicable disease and cancer control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1553-1568
Number of pages16
JournalJAMA oncology
Volume4
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

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Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Mortality
Incidence
Neoplasms
Global Burden of Disease
Cause of Death
Resource Allocation
Population Growth
Conservation of Natural Resources
Population Dynamics
Human Development
Bronchi

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

@article{906744d96d3a4f5d91af8929e935d42b,
title = "Global, Regional, and National Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived With Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life-Years for 29 Cancer Groups, 1990 to 2016: A Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study",
abstract = "Importance: The increasing burden due to cancer and other noncommunicable diseases poses a threat to human development, which has resulted in global political commitments reflected in the Sustainable Development Goals as well as the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Action Plan on Non-Communicable Diseases. To determine if these commitments have resulted in improved cancer control, quantitative assessments of the cancer burden are required. Objective: To assess the burden for 29 cancer groups over time to provide a framework for policy discussion, resource allocation, and research focus. Evidence Review: Cancer incidence, mortality, years lived with disability, years of life lost, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were evaluated for 195 countries and territories by age and sex using the Global Burden of Disease study estimation methods. Levels and trends were analyzed over time, as well as by the Sociodemographic Index (SDI). Changes in incident cases were categorized by changes due to epidemiological vs demographic transition. Findings: In 2016, there were 17.2 million cancer cases worldwide and 8.9 million deaths. Cancer cases increased by 28{\%} between 2006 and 2016. The smallest increase was seen in high SDI countries. Globally, population aging contributed 17{\%}; population growth, 12{\%}; and changes in age-specific rates, -1{\%} to this change. The most common incident cancer globally for men was prostate cancer (1.4 million cases). The leading cause of cancer deaths and DALYs was tracheal, bronchus, and lung cancer (1.2 million deaths and 25.4 million DALYs). For women, the most common incident cancer and the leading cause of cancer deaths and DALYs was breast cancer (1.7 million incident cases, 535 000 deaths, and 14.9 million DALYs). In 2016, cancer caused 213.2 million DALYs globally for both sexes combined. Between 2006 and 2016, the average annual age-standardized incidence rates for all cancers combined increased in 130 of 195 countries or territories, and the average annual age-standardized death rates decreased within that timeframe in 143 of 195 countries or territories. Conclusions and Relevance: Large disparities exist between countries in cancer incidence, deaths, and associated disability. Scaling up cancer prevention and ensuring universal access to cancer care are required for health equity and to fulfill the global commitments for noncommunicable disease and cancer control.",
author = "{Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration} and Christina Fitzmaurice and Akinyemiju, {Tomi F.} and {Al Lami}, {Faris Hasan} and Tahiya Alam and Reza Alizadeh-Navaei and Christine Allen and Ubai Alsharif and Nelson Alvis-Guzman and Erfan Amini and Anderson, {Benjamin O.} and Olatunde Aremu and Al Artaman and Asgedom, {Solomon Weldegebreal} and Reza Assadi and Atey, {Tesfay Mehari} and Leticia Avila-Burgos and Ashish Awasthi and {Ba Saleem}, {Huda Omer} and Aleksandra Barac and Bennett, {James R.} and Bensenor, {Isabela M.} and Nickhill Bhakta and Hermann Brenner and Lucero Cahuana-Hurtado and Casta{\~n}eda-Orjuela, {Carlos A.} and Ferr{\'a}n Catal{\'a}-L{\'o}pez and Choi, {Jee Young Jasmine} and Christopher, {Devasahayam Jesudas} and Chung, {Sheng Chia} and Curado, {Maria Paula} and Lalit Dandona and Rakhi Dandona and {das Neves}, Jos{\'e} and Subhojit Dey and Dharmaratne, {Samath D.} and Doku, {David Teye} and Driscoll, {Tim R.} and Manisha Dubey and Hedyeh Ebrahimi and Dumessa Edessa and Ziad El-Khatib and Endries, {Aman Yesuf} and Florian Fischer and Force, {Lisa M.} and Foreman, {Kyle J.} and Gebrehiwot, {Solomon Weldemariam} and Gopalani, {Sameer Vali} and Giuseppe Grosso and Rahul Gupta and Hosgood, {Howard D.}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.2706",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "1553--1568",
journal = "JAMA oncology",
issn = "2374-2437",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Global, Regional, and National Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived With Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life-Years for 29 Cancer Groups, 1990 to 2016

T2 - A Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study

AU - Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration

AU - Fitzmaurice, Christina

AU - Akinyemiju, Tomi F.

AU - Al Lami, Faris Hasan

AU - Alam, Tahiya

AU - Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

AU - Allen, Christine

AU - Alsharif, Ubai

AU - Alvis-Guzman, Nelson

AU - Amini, Erfan

AU - Anderson, Benjamin O.

AU - Aremu, Olatunde

AU - Artaman, Al

AU - Asgedom, Solomon Weldegebreal

AU - Assadi, Reza

AU - Atey, Tesfay Mehari

AU - Avila-Burgos, Leticia

AU - Awasthi, Ashish

AU - Ba Saleem, Huda Omer

AU - Barac, Aleksandra

AU - Bennett, James R.

AU - Bensenor, Isabela M.

AU - Bhakta, Nickhill

AU - Brenner, Hermann

AU - Cahuana-Hurtado, Lucero

AU - Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos A.

AU - Catalá-López, Ferrán

AU - Choi, Jee Young Jasmine

AU - Christopher, Devasahayam Jesudas

AU - Chung, Sheng Chia

AU - Curado, Maria Paula

AU - Dandona, Lalit

AU - Dandona, Rakhi

AU - das Neves, José

AU - Dey, Subhojit

AU - Dharmaratne, Samath D.

AU - Doku, David Teye

AU - Driscoll, Tim R.

AU - Dubey, Manisha

AU - Ebrahimi, Hedyeh

AU - Edessa, Dumessa

AU - El-Khatib, Ziad

AU - Endries, Aman Yesuf

AU - Fischer, Florian

AU - Force, Lisa M.

AU - Foreman, Kyle J.

AU - Gebrehiwot, Solomon Weldemariam

AU - Gopalani, Sameer Vali

AU - Grosso, Giuseppe

AU - Gupta, Rahul

AU - Hosgood, Howard D.

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Importance: The increasing burden due to cancer and other noncommunicable diseases poses a threat to human development, which has resulted in global political commitments reflected in the Sustainable Development Goals as well as the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Action Plan on Non-Communicable Diseases. To determine if these commitments have resulted in improved cancer control, quantitative assessments of the cancer burden are required. Objective: To assess the burden for 29 cancer groups over time to provide a framework for policy discussion, resource allocation, and research focus. Evidence Review: Cancer incidence, mortality, years lived with disability, years of life lost, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were evaluated for 195 countries and territories by age and sex using the Global Burden of Disease study estimation methods. Levels and trends were analyzed over time, as well as by the Sociodemographic Index (SDI). Changes in incident cases were categorized by changes due to epidemiological vs demographic transition. Findings: In 2016, there were 17.2 million cancer cases worldwide and 8.9 million deaths. Cancer cases increased by 28% between 2006 and 2016. The smallest increase was seen in high SDI countries. Globally, population aging contributed 17%; population growth, 12%; and changes in age-specific rates, -1% to this change. The most common incident cancer globally for men was prostate cancer (1.4 million cases). The leading cause of cancer deaths and DALYs was tracheal, bronchus, and lung cancer (1.2 million deaths and 25.4 million DALYs). For women, the most common incident cancer and the leading cause of cancer deaths and DALYs was breast cancer (1.7 million incident cases, 535 000 deaths, and 14.9 million DALYs). In 2016, cancer caused 213.2 million DALYs globally for both sexes combined. Between 2006 and 2016, the average annual age-standardized incidence rates for all cancers combined increased in 130 of 195 countries or territories, and the average annual age-standardized death rates decreased within that timeframe in 143 of 195 countries or territories. Conclusions and Relevance: Large disparities exist between countries in cancer incidence, deaths, and associated disability. Scaling up cancer prevention and ensuring universal access to cancer care are required for health equity and to fulfill the global commitments for noncommunicable disease and cancer control.

AB - Importance: The increasing burden due to cancer and other noncommunicable diseases poses a threat to human development, which has resulted in global political commitments reflected in the Sustainable Development Goals as well as the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Action Plan on Non-Communicable Diseases. To determine if these commitments have resulted in improved cancer control, quantitative assessments of the cancer burden are required. Objective: To assess the burden for 29 cancer groups over time to provide a framework for policy discussion, resource allocation, and research focus. Evidence Review: Cancer incidence, mortality, years lived with disability, years of life lost, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were evaluated for 195 countries and territories by age and sex using the Global Burden of Disease study estimation methods. Levels and trends were analyzed over time, as well as by the Sociodemographic Index (SDI). Changes in incident cases were categorized by changes due to epidemiological vs demographic transition. Findings: In 2016, there were 17.2 million cancer cases worldwide and 8.9 million deaths. Cancer cases increased by 28% between 2006 and 2016. The smallest increase was seen in high SDI countries. Globally, population aging contributed 17%; population growth, 12%; and changes in age-specific rates, -1% to this change. The most common incident cancer globally for men was prostate cancer (1.4 million cases). The leading cause of cancer deaths and DALYs was tracheal, bronchus, and lung cancer (1.2 million deaths and 25.4 million DALYs). For women, the most common incident cancer and the leading cause of cancer deaths and DALYs was breast cancer (1.7 million incident cases, 535 000 deaths, and 14.9 million DALYs). In 2016, cancer caused 213.2 million DALYs globally for both sexes combined. Between 2006 and 2016, the average annual age-standardized incidence rates for all cancers combined increased in 130 of 195 countries or territories, and the average annual age-standardized death rates decreased within that timeframe in 143 of 195 countries or territories. Conclusions and Relevance: Large disparities exist between countries in cancer incidence, deaths, and associated disability. Scaling up cancer prevention and ensuring universal access to cancer care are required for health equity and to fulfill the global commitments for noncommunicable disease and cancer control.

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U2 - 10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.2706

DO - 10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.2706

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JO - JAMA oncology

JF - JAMA oncology

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