Gestational Diabetes, Subsequent Type 2 Diabetes, and Food Security Status: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007–2018

Lihua Li, Jiayi Ji, Yan Li, Yuanhui Huang, Jee Young Moon, Ryung S. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction Despite many studies linking various risk factors to the association between gestational diabetes and subsequent type 2 diabetes, little is known about how food insecurity affects their association. We aimed to assess how the association between gestational diabetes and subsequent type 2 diabetes varies by food security status among women in the US. Methods This study is a secondary data analysis of 9,505 US women aged 20 years or older who had at least 1 live birth; we used crosssectional data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2007 through 2018. The main outcome was a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in the subsequent years after the first live birth. We used multivariable survey-weighted negative binomial regressions to examine whether the association between gestational diabetes and subsequent type 2 diabetes differed by food security status, with and without adjusting for health behavior factors. Results Gestational diabetes was significantly associated with subsequent type 2 diabetes (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.57; 95% CI, 2.45–2.69). The association between gestational diabetes and subsequent type 2 diabetes was significantly different by food security status (IRR, 2.34; 95% CI, 2.23–2.45 among food-secure women; IRR, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.70–3.28 among food-insecure women). Conclusion The association between gestational diabetes and subsequent type 2 diabetes differs significantly by food security status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberE42
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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