FDNY and 9/11: Clinical services and health outcomes in World Trade Center-exposed firefighters and EMS workers from 2001 to 2016

Jennifer Yip, Mayris P. Webber, Rachel Zeig-Owens, Madeline Vossbrinck, Ankura Singh, Kerry Kelly, David J. Prezant

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: After the World Trade Center (WTC) attacks on September 11, 2001, the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) instituted a WTC medical monitoring and treatment program and established a data center to document health outcomes in the WTC-exposed workforce of ∼16,000 firefighters and EMS workers. Methods: FDNY schedules routine monitoring exams every 12–18 months and physical and mental health treatment appointments, as required. Results: FDNY research studies have consistently found that early arrival to work and/or prolonged work at the WTC-site increased the risks for adverse physical and mental health outcomes. To date, a substantial proportion has been diagnosed with obstructive airways disease, chronic rhinosinusitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease; a quarter has two or more of these conditions. Conclusions: While much has been learned, the entire spectrum and trajectory of WTC-related disorders and their mechanisms of onset and persistence remain to be fully described. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:695–708, 2016.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-708
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume59
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Keywords

  • ems workers
  • firefighters
  • occupational health
  • September 11 terrorist attacks
  • world trade center

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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