Families of children with mental retardation: Comprehensive view from an epidemiologic perspective

H. Koller, S. A. Richardson, Mindy Joy Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data covering a 15-year period on the health, behavior, and functioning of a representative population of families of children with mental retardation and comparison children were used in cluster analysis to obtain relatively homogeneous groupings of families. Only a small minority of families of children with mental retardation did not cluster together with comparison families. More than a third functioned well and had a middle-class orientation; less than a third functioned poorly. A few clusters had ambiguous configurations, but most were easily understood and conformed generally to expectations in validation analyses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-332
Number of pages18
JournalAmerican Journal on Mental Retardation
Volume97
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1992

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Intellectual Disability
health behavior
cluster analysis
grouping
middle class
Cluster Analysis
minority
Mental Retardation
Health
Population
Grouping
Middle Class
Minorities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Families of children with mental retardation : Comprehensive view from an epidemiologic perspective. / Koller, H.; Richardson, S. A.; Katz, Mindy Joy.

In: American Journal on Mental Retardation, Vol. 97, No. 3, 1992, p. 315-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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