Factors associated with reverse-migration separation among a cohort of low-income chinese immigrant families in New York City

Kenny Kwong, Henry Chung, Loretta Sun, Jolene C. Chou, Anna Taylor-Shih

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

A survey was administered to 219 Chinese immigrant women receiving prenatal and postnatal care in a community health center in New York City to examine the practice of and factors associated with reverse-migrationsending American-born children to China to be raised by extended family members, and bringing them back upon reaching school age. Results suggest that this practice was common (57%), and was significantly associated with certain maternal and family sociodemographic characteristics. Reasons leading to and perceived impact of reverse-migration separation were also explored. The long-term consequences of reverse-migration separation on child development or family dynamics are unknown. Further research is indicated on larger samples of low-income Chinese immigrant families to explore the prevalence and consequences of this practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-359
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Work in Health Care
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 28 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Childcare
  • Chinese American
  • Immigrants
  • Separation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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