Factors Associated with Increased Reading Frequency in Children Exposed to Reach Out and Read

Sharon Rikin, Kevin Glatt, Pippa Simpson, Yumei Cao, Ogugua Anene-Maidoh, Earnestine Willis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective A 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Statement on Literacy Promotion recommends providers endorse daily caregiver-child reading during health supervision visits. Reach Out and Read (ROR) is a widely used model of office-based early literacy promotion. We hypothesized that exposure to ROR and other variables such as reading as part of a bedtime routine positively correlate with caregiver-child reading frequency. Methods This is a cross-sectional study based on a convenience sample of caregivers at 8 ROR-Milwaukee sites, which serve predominantly low-income populations in Milwaukee. On the basis of results of previously validated questionnaires, odds ratios were calculated to determine which variables are significantly associated with caregivers' reading to children 0 to 2 (rarely), 3 to 6 (often), and 7 (daily) days per week. Random forest analysis was performed to examine relative importance of variables in predicting caregivers' reading frequency. Results A total of 256 caregivers were eligible for analysis; those who reported receiving ≥4 books from pediatricians read to children more days per week compared to those receiving fewer books (5.07 vs 3.61, P <.001) and were more likely to read daily (odds ratio 3.07, 95% confidence interval 1.80-5.23). Caregivers' interest in reading, number of children's books in the home, reading as part of a bedtime routine, and number of books received from pediatricians were among the most important variables in distinguishing rarely, often, and daily reading caregivers. Conclusions Exposure to ROR-Milwaukee's intervention is associated with increased reading frequency. Identified variables such as reading as a bedtime routine and number of children's books in the home should be targets for future literacy-promoting interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)651-657
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reading
Caregivers
Odds Ratio
Poverty
Cross-Sectional Studies
Confidence Intervals
Pediatrics
Health
Literacy

Keywords

  • literacy
  • pediatrics
  • primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Factors Associated with Increased Reading Frequency in Children Exposed to Reach Out and Read. / Rikin, Sharon; Glatt, Kevin; Simpson, Pippa; Cao, Yumei; Anene-Maidoh, Ogugua; Willis, Earnestine.

In: Academic Pediatrics, Vol. 15, No. 6, 01.11.2015, p. 651-657.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rikin, Sharon ; Glatt, Kevin ; Simpson, Pippa ; Cao, Yumei ; Anene-Maidoh, Ogugua ; Willis, Earnestine. / Factors Associated with Increased Reading Frequency in Children Exposed to Reach Out and Read. In: Academic Pediatrics. 2015 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 651-657.
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