Energetics of Pathogenic Bacteria and Opportunities for Drug Development

Gregory M. Cook, Chris Greening, Kiel Hards, Michael Berney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The emergence and spread of drug-resistant pathogens and our inability to develop new antimicrobials to overcome resistance has inspired scientists to consider new targets for drug development. Cellular bioenergetics is an area showing promise for the development of new antimicrobials, particularly in the discovery of new anti-tuberculosis drugs where several new compounds have entered clinical trials. In this review, we have examined the bioenergetics of various bacterial pathogens, highlighting the versatility of electron donor and acceptor utilisation and the modularity of electron transport chain components in bacteria. In addition to re-examining classical concepts, we explore new literature that reveals the intricacies of pathogen energetics, for example, how Salmonella enterica and Campylobacter jejuni exploit host and microbiota to derive powerful electron donors and sinks; the strategies Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa use to persist in lung tissues; and the importance of sodium energetics and electron bifurcation in the chemiosmotic anaerobe Fusobacterium nucleatum. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and pharmacological data suggests that, in addition to the clinically-approved target F1Fo-ATP synthase, NADH dehydrogenase type II, succinate dehydrogenase, hydrogenase, cytochrome bd oxidase, and menaquinone biosynthesis pathways are particularly promising next-generation drug targets. The realisation of cellular energetics as a rich target space for the development of new antimicrobials will be dependent upon gaining increased understanding of the energetic processes utilised by pathogens in host environments and the ability to design bacterial-specific inhibitors of these processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-62
Number of pages62
JournalAdvances in Microbial Physiology
Volume65
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Bacteria
Electrons
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Energy Metabolism
Fusobacterium nucleatum
Vitamin K 2
Hydrogenase
Campylobacter jejuni
Salmonella enterica
Succinate Dehydrogenase
Microbiota
Electron Transport Complex IV
Electron Transport
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Tuberculosis
Adenosine Triphosphate
Sodium
Clinical Trials
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Bacterial energetics
  • Drug targets
  • Pathogenic bacteria
  • Physiology
  • Respiration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Physiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Energetics of Pathogenic Bacteria and Opportunities for Drug Development. / Cook, Gregory M.; Greening, Chris; Hards, Kiel; Berney, Michael.

In: Advances in Microbial Physiology, Vol. 65, 2014, p. 1-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cook, Gregory M. ; Greening, Chris ; Hards, Kiel ; Berney, Michael. / Energetics of Pathogenic Bacteria and Opportunities for Drug Development. In: Advances in Microbial Physiology. 2014 ; Vol. 65. pp. 1-62.
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