Endocytosis is a critical step in entry of subgroup B avian leukosis viruses

Felipe Diaz-Griffero, Steven Ari Hoschander, Jürgen Brojatsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The avian leukosis virus (ALV) entry mechanism is controversial, with evidence for and against a low-pH requirement for viral fusion. To further address this question, we tested the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pseudotyped with the envelope protein of subgroup B ALV (ALV-B) in the presence of three different lysosomotropic agents. These lysosomotropic agents were able to block the entry of wild-type and pseudotyped ALV-B in two different cell lines, strongly suggesting that ALV-B requires a low-pH step for entry. ALV-B and pH-dependent Semliki Forest virus (SFV) entered cells with slower uptake kinetics than HIV-1, which is pH independent. These slow uptake rates support the theory that ALV-B utilizes endocytic pathways to enter cells. Using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy analysis, we visualized the colocalization of virus particles with the endosomal marker transferrin and demonstrated virus particles in clathrin-coated vesicles and endosome-like structures. Surprisingly, a low-pH treatment did not overcome the inhibition of ALV-B entry by lysosomotropic agents. This indicates that, in contrast to SFV, ALV-B is unable to fuse at the cellular surface, even at a low pH. Taken together, our findings suggest that endocytosis and a subsequent low-pH step are critical for successful ALV-B infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12866-12876
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume76
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2002

Fingerprint

Avian Leukosis Virus
Avian leukosis virus
Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 1
endocytosis
Endocytosis
Semliki Forest virus
Semliki forest virus
Virus Internalization
Human immunodeficiency virus 1
virion
Virion
HIV-1
Clathrin-Coated Vesicles
uptake mechanisms
coated vesicles
clathrin
endosomes
Endosomes
transferrin
Virus Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Endocytosis is a critical step in entry of subgroup B avian leukosis viruses. / Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Hoschander, Steven Ari; Brojatsch, Jürgen.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 76, No. 24, 12.2002, p. 12866-12876.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diaz-Griffero, Felipe ; Hoschander, Steven Ari ; Brojatsch, Jürgen. / Endocytosis is a critical step in entry of subgroup B avian leukosis viruses. In: Journal of Virology. 2002 ; Vol. 76, No. 24. pp. 12866-12876.
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