Elevated risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome among Asians and South Asians: Results from the 2004 New York City HANES

Swapnil N. Rajpathak, Leena S. Gupta, Elizabeth Needham Waddell, Ushma D. Upadhyay, Rachel P. Wildman, Robert C. Kaplan, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Judith Wylie-Rosett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Although numerous studies have identified an elevated risk of diabetes or impaired fasting glucose among Asians, there are limited data examining variability in risk among Asian subpopulations. We estimated prevalence of diabetes (DM), metabolic syndrome (MS) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), by race/ethnicity and by Asian subgroup. Design, settings and participants: This study was conducted using the fasting subsample of the 2004 New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES; n=1,324), a local version of the NHANES. Using country of origin information, we constructed South Asian and other Asian categories. Main outcome measures: DM, MS and IFG. Results: Age-standardized prevalence estimates of DM, MS and IFG were 10.8%, 13.3% and 21.4% among Whites, 16.1%, 12.0% and 32.4% among all Asians, and 35.4%, 17.7% and 15.9% among foreign-born South Asians, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, Asians had significantly higher odds of prevalent IFG (Adjusted odds ratio [AOR]:2.64; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60-4.38) and MS (AOR:2.09; 95%CI: 1.19-3.68), compared to Whites. South Asians were more likely to have DM (AOR:4.88; 95%CI: 1.52-15.66) and MS (AOR:5.59; 95%CI: 1.69-18.50) compared to Whites, while other Asians were at increased prevalence of IFG (AOR:2.89; 95%CI: 1.65-5.07). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the observed White/Asian disparity in DM risk may be primarily attributable to elevated risk among South Asians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-230
Number of pages6
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume20
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2010

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Fasting
Glucose
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Nutrition Surveys
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Health

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Impaired fasting glucose
  • Metabolic syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Elevated risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome among Asians and South Asians : Results from the 2004 New York City HANES. / Rajpathak, Swapnil N.; Gupta, Leena S.; Waddell, Elizabeth Needham; Upadhyay, Ushma D.; Wildman, Rachel P.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Wylie-Rosett, Judith.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 20, No. 3, 06.2010, p. 225-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rajpathak, SN, Gupta, LS, Waddell, EN, Upadhyay, UD, Wildman, RP, Kaplan, RC, Wassertheil-Smoller, S & Wylie-Rosett, J 2010, 'Elevated risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome among Asians and South Asians: Results from the 2004 New York City HANES', Ethnicity and Disease, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 225-230.
Rajpathak, Swapnil N. ; Gupta, Leena S. ; Waddell, Elizabeth Needham ; Upadhyay, Ushma D. ; Wildman, Rachel P. ; Kaplan, Robert C. ; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia ; Wylie-Rosett, Judith. / Elevated risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome among Asians and South Asians : Results from the 2004 New York City HANES. In: Ethnicity and Disease. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 225-230.
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abstract = "Objective: Although numerous studies have identified an elevated risk of diabetes or impaired fasting glucose among Asians, there are limited data examining variability in risk among Asian subpopulations. We estimated prevalence of diabetes (DM), metabolic syndrome (MS) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), by race/ethnicity and by Asian subgroup. Design, settings and participants: This study was conducted using the fasting subsample of the 2004 New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES; n=1,324), a local version of the NHANES. Using country of origin information, we constructed South Asian and other Asian categories. Main outcome measures: DM, MS and IFG. Results: Age-standardized prevalence estimates of DM, MS and IFG were 10.8{\%}, 13.3{\%} and 21.4{\%} among Whites, 16.1{\%}, 12.0{\%} and 32.4{\%} among all Asians, and 35.4{\%}, 17.7{\%} and 15.9{\%} among foreign-born South Asians, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, Asians had significantly higher odds of prevalent IFG (Adjusted odds ratio [AOR]:2.64; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.60-4.38) and MS (AOR:2.09; 95{\%}CI: 1.19-3.68), compared to Whites. South Asians were more likely to have DM (AOR:4.88; 95{\%}CI: 1.52-15.66) and MS (AOR:5.59; 95{\%}CI: 1.69-18.50) compared to Whites, while other Asians were at increased prevalence of IFG (AOR:2.89; 95{\%}CI: 1.65-5.07). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the observed White/Asian disparity in DM risk may be primarily attributable to elevated risk among South Asians.",
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T1 - Elevated risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome among Asians and South Asians

T2 - Results from the 2004 New York City HANES

AU - Rajpathak, Swapnil N.

AU - Gupta, Leena S.

AU - Waddell, Elizabeth Needham

AU - Upadhyay, Ushma D.

AU - Wildman, Rachel P.

AU - Kaplan, Robert C.

AU - Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia

AU - Wylie-Rosett, Judith

PY - 2010/6

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N2 - Objective: Although numerous studies have identified an elevated risk of diabetes or impaired fasting glucose among Asians, there are limited data examining variability in risk among Asian subpopulations. We estimated prevalence of diabetes (DM), metabolic syndrome (MS) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), by race/ethnicity and by Asian subgroup. Design, settings and participants: This study was conducted using the fasting subsample of the 2004 New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES; n=1,324), a local version of the NHANES. Using country of origin information, we constructed South Asian and other Asian categories. Main outcome measures: DM, MS and IFG. Results: Age-standardized prevalence estimates of DM, MS and IFG were 10.8%, 13.3% and 21.4% among Whites, 16.1%, 12.0% and 32.4% among all Asians, and 35.4%, 17.7% and 15.9% among foreign-born South Asians, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, Asians had significantly higher odds of prevalent IFG (Adjusted odds ratio [AOR]:2.64; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60-4.38) and MS (AOR:2.09; 95%CI: 1.19-3.68), compared to Whites. South Asians were more likely to have DM (AOR:4.88; 95%CI: 1.52-15.66) and MS (AOR:5.59; 95%CI: 1.69-18.50) compared to Whites, while other Asians were at increased prevalence of IFG (AOR:2.89; 95%CI: 1.65-5.07). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the observed White/Asian disparity in DM risk may be primarily attributable to elevated risk among South Asians.

AB - Objective: Although numerous studies have identified an elevated risk of diabetes or impaired fasting glucose among Asians, there are limited data examining variability in risk among Asian subpopulations. We estimated prevalence of diabetes (DM), metabolic syndrome (MS) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), by race/ethnicity and by Asian subgroup. Design, settings and participants: This study was conducted using the fasting subsample of the 2004 New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES; n=1,324), a local version of the NHANES. Using country of origin information, we constructed South Asian and other Asian categories. Main outcome measures: DM, MS and IFG. Results: Age-standardized prevalence estimates of DM, MS and IFG were 10.8%, 13.3% and 21.4% among Whites, 16.1%, 12.0% and 32.4% among all Asians, and 35.4%, 17.7% and 15.9% among foreign-born South Asians, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, Asians had significantly higher odds of prevalent IFG (Adjusted odds ratio [AOR]:2.64; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60-4.38) and MS (AOR:2.09; 95%CI: 1.19-3.68), compared to Whites. South Asians were more likely to have DM (AOR:4.88; 95%CI: 1.52-15.66) and MS (AOR:5.59; 95%CI: 1.69-18.50) compared to Whites, while other Asians were at increased prevalence of IFG (AOR:2.89; 95%CI: 1.65-5.07). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the observed White/Asian disparity in DM risk may be primarily attributable to elevated risk among South Asians.

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KW - Impaired fasting glucose

KW - Metabolic syndrome

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