Efficacy and durability of robotic heller myotomy for achalasia

patient symptoms and satisfaction at long-term follow-up

Kyle A. Perry, Aliyah Kanji, Joseph M. Drosdeck, John G. Linn, Anthony Chan, Peter Muscarella, W. Scott Melvin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) has become the standard treatment for achalasia in the USA. Robot-assisted Heller myotomy (RHM) has emerged as an alternative approach due to improved visualization and fine motor control, but long-term follow-up studies have not been reported. We sought to report the long-term outcomes of RHM and compare them to those of LHM.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed for patients who underwent laparoscopic or RHM between 1995 and 2006. Long-term follow-up was performed via mail or telephone questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was durable relief of dysphagia without need for further intervention. Secondary outcomes included gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, disease-specific quality of life, and patient satisfaction with their operation.

Results: Seventy-five patients underwent laparoscopic (n = 19) or robotic (n = 56) myotomy during the study period. Long-term follow-up was obtained in 53 (71 %) patients with a median interval of 9 years. RHM was associated with a decreased mucosal injury rate (0 vs. 16 %, p = 0.01) and median hospital stay (1 vs. 2 days, p < 0.01) compared to conventional laparoscopy. All patients reported initial dysphagia relief, and 80 % required no further intervention. This did not differ between groups. Sixty-two percent required medications to control reflux symptoms at long-term follow-up, including 56 % following robotic myotomy and 80 % after laparoscopic myotomy (p = 0.27). Overall, 95 % of patients were satisfied with their operation, and 91 % would choose surgery again given the benefit of hindsight.

Conclusion: There is a dearth of long-term follow-up data to support the effectiveness of RHM. This study demonstrates durable dysphagia relief in the vast majority of patients with a high degree of patient satisfaction and a low rate of esophageal mucosal injury. While a significant proportion of patients report reflux symptoms, these symptoms are well controlled with medical acid suppression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3162-3167
Number of pages6
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume28
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 21 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Esophageal Achalasia
Robotics
Patient Satisfaction
Deglutition Disorders
Wounds and Injuries
Postal Service
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Telephone
Laparoscopy
Length of Stay
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Quality of Life
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Acids

Keywords

  • Achalasia
  • Heller myotomy
  • Laparoscopy
  • Robotic Heller myotomy
  • Robotics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Efficacy and durability of robotic heller myotomy for achalasia : patient symptoms and satisfaction at long-term follow-up. / Perry, Kyle A.; Kanji, Aliyah; Drosdeck, Joseph M.; Linn, John G.; Chan, Anthony; Muscarella, Peter; Melvin, W. Scott.

In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, Vol. 28, No. 11, 21.10.2014, p. 3162-3167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) has become the standard treatment for achalasia in the USA. Robot-assisted Heller myotomy (RHM) has emerged as an alternative approach due to improved visualization and fine motor control, but long-term follow-up studies have not been reported. We sought to report the long-term outcomes of RHM and compare them to those of LHM.Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed for patients who underwent laparoscopic or RHM between 1995 and 2006. Long-term follow-up was performed via mail or telephone questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was durable relief of dysphagia without need for further intervention. Secondary outcomes included gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, disease-specific quality of life, and patient satisfaction with their operation.Results: Seventy-five patients underwent laparoscopic (n = 19) or robotic (n = 56) myotomy during the study period. Long-term follow-up was obtained in 53 (71 {\%}) patients with a median interval of 9 years. RHM was associated with a decreased mucosal injury rate (0 vs. 16 {\%}, p = 0.01) and median hospital stay (1 vs. 2 days, p < 0.01) compared to conventional laparoscopy. All patients reported initial dysphagia relief, and 80 {\%} required no further intervention. This did not differ between groups. Sixty-two percent required medications to control reflux symptoms at long-term follow-up, including 56 {\%} following robotic myotomy and 80 {\%} after laparoscopic myotomy (p = 0.27). Overall, 95 {\%} of patients were satisfied with their operation, and 91 {\%} would choose surgery again given the benefit of hindsight.Conclusion: There is a dearth of long-term follow-up data to support the effectiveness of RHM. This study demonstrates durable dysphagia relief in the vast majority of patients with a high degree of patient satisfaction and a low rate of esophageal mucosal injury. While a significant proportion of patients report reflux symptoms, these symptoms are well controlled with medical acid suppression.",
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T1 - Efficacy and durability of robotic heller myotomy for achalasia

T2 - patient symptoms and satisfaction at long-term follow-up

AU - Perry, Kyle A.

AU - Kanji, Aliyah

AU - Drosdeck, Joseph M.

AU - Linn, John G.

AU - Chan, Anthony

AU - Muscarella, Peter

AU - Melvin, W. Scott

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N2 - Background: Laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) has become the standard treatment for achalasia in the USA. Robot-assisted Heller myotomy (RHM) has emerged as an alternative approach due to improved visualization and fine motor control, but long-term follow-up studies have not been reported. We sought to report the long-term outcomes of RHM and compare them to those of LHM.Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed for patients who underwent laparoscopic or RHM between 1995 and 2006. Long-term follow-up was performed via mail or telephone questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was durable relief of dysphagia without need for further intervention. Secondary outcomes included gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, disease-specific quality of life, and patient satisfaction with their operation.Results: Seventy-five patients underwent laparoscopic (n = 19) or robotic (n = 56) myotomy during the study period. Long-term follow-up was obtained in 53 (71 %) patients with a median interval of 9 years. RHM was associated with a decreased mucosal injury rate (0 vs. 16 %, p = 0.01) and median hospital stay (1 vs. 2 days, p < 0.01) compared to conventional laparoscopy. All patients reported initial dysphagia relief, and 80 % required no further intervention. This did not differ between groups. Sixty-two percent required medications to control reflux symptoms at long-term follow-up, including 56 % following robotic myotomy and 80 % after laparoscopic myotomy (p = 0.27). Overall, 95 % of patients were satisfied with their operation, and 91 % would choose surgery again given the benefit of hindsight.Conclusion: There is a dearth of long-term follow-up data to support the effectiveness of RHM. This study demonstrates durable dysphagia relief in the vast majority of patients with a high degree of patient satisfaction and a low rate of esophageal mucosal injury. While a significant proportion of patients report reflux symptoms, these symptoms are well controlled with medical acid suppression.

AB - Background: Laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) has become the standard treatment for achalasia in the USA. Robot-assisted Heller myotomy (RHM) has emerged as an alternative approach due to improved visualization and fine motor control, but long-term follow-up studies have not been reported. We sought to report the long-term outcomes of RHM and compare them to those of LHM.Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed for patients who underwent laparoscopic or RHM between 1995 and 2006. Long-term follow-up was performed via mail or telephone questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was durable relief of dysphagia without need for further intervention. Secondary outcomes included gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, disease-specific quality of life, and patient satisfaction with their operation.Results: Seventy-five patients underwent laparoscopic (n = 19) or robotic (n = 56) myotomy during the study period. Long-term follow-up was obtained in 53 (71 %) patients with a median interval of 9 years. RHM was associated with a decreased mucosal injury rate (0 vs. 16 %, p = 0.01) and median hospital stay (1 vs. 2 days, p < 0.01) compared to conventional laparoscopy. All patients reported initial dysphagia relief, and 80 % required no further intervention. This did not differ between groups. Sixty-two percent required medications to control reflux symptoms at long-term follow-up, including 56 % following robotic myotomy and 80 % after laparoscopic myotomy (p = 0.27). Overall, 95 % of patients were satisfied with their operation, and 91 % would choose surgery again given the benefit of hindsight.Conclusion: There is a dearth of long-term follow-up data to support the effectiveness of RHM. This study demonstrates durable dysphagia relief in the vast majority of patients with a high degree of patient satisfaction and a low rate of esophageal mucosal injury. While a significant proportion of patients report reflux symptoms, these symptoms are well controlled with medical acid suppression.

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