Dose-response relationship between late-life physical activity and incident dementia: A pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies of memory in an international consortium

for Cohort Studies of Memory in an International Consortium (COSMIC)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Though consistent evidence suggests that physical activity may delay dementia onset, the duration and amount of activity required remains unclear. Methods: We harmonized longitudinal data of 11,988 participants from 10 cohorts in eight countries to examine the dose-response relationship between late-life physical activity and incident dementia among older adults. Results: Using no physical activity as a reference, dementia risk decreased with duration of physical activity up to 3.1 to 6.0 hours/week (hazard ratio [HR] 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67 to 1.15 for 0.1 to 3.0 hours/week; HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.89 for 3.1 to 6.0 hours/week), but plateaued with higher duration. For the amount of physical activity, a similar pattern of dose-response curve was observed, with an inflection point of 9.1 to 18.0 metabolic equivalent value (MET)-hours/week (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.22 for 0.1 to 9.0 MET-hours/week; HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.53 to 0.93 for 9.1 to 18.0 MET-hours/week). Discussion: This cross-national analysis suggests that performing 3.1 to 6.0 hours of physical activity and expending 9.1 to 18.0/MET-hours of energy per week may reduce dementia risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • cohort
  • dementia
  • dose-response
  • physical activity
  • pooled analysis
  • population-based

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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