Does race make a difference among primary care patients with alcohol problems who agree to enroll in a study of brief interventions?

J. Conigliaro, S. A. Maisto, M. McNeil, K. Kraemer, M. E. Kelley, R. Conigliaro, M. O'Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study describes the severity, alcohol consumption, consequences, readiness to change, and coping behaviors of African-American and white primary care patients enrolled in a trial of brief interventions for problem drinking. In multivariate analysis, unemployment but not race was associated with clinical indicators of alcohol problems. African-Americans reported no difference in alcohol consumption and similar quality of life scores African-American race and unemployment were both associated with increased identification and resolution of alcohol problems. There was no difference in readiness to change, but African-Americans reported more problems related to alcohol and greater use of coping behaviors to avoid drinking. African-Americans may be better equipped to manage drinking problems when they do occur due to increased familiarity with coping mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-330
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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African Americans
Primary Health Care
Alcohols
Drinking
Unemployment
Psychological Adaptation
Alcohol Drinking
Multivariate Analysis
Quality of Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Does race make a difference among primary care patients with alcohol problems who agree to enroll in a study of brief interventions? / Conigliaro, J.; Maisto, S. A.; McNeil, M.; Kraemer, K.; Kelley, M. E.; Conigliaro, R.; O'Connor, M.

In: American Journal on Addictions, Vol. 9, No. 4, 2000, p. 321-330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Conigliaro, J. ; Maisto, S. A. ; McNeil, M. ; Kraemer, K. ; Kelley, M. E. ; Conigliaro, R. ; O'Connor, M. / Does race make a difference among primary care patients with alcohol problems who agree to enroll in a study of brief interventions?. In: American Journal on Addictions. 2000 ; Vol. 9, No. 4. pp. 321-330.
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