DNA vaccine priming for seasonal influenza vaccine in children and adolescents 6 to 17 years of age

A phase 1 randomized clinical trial

VRC 702 study team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Children are susceptible to severe influenza infections and facilitate community transmission. One potential strategy to improve vaccine immunogenicity in children against seasonal influenza involves a trivalent hemagglutinin DNA prime-trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) boost regimen. METHODS: Sites enrolled adolescents, followed by younger children, to receive DNA prime (1 mg or 4 mg) intramuscularly by needle-free jet injector (Biojector), followed by split virus 2012/13 seasonal IIV3 boost by needle and syringe approximately 18 weeks later. A comparator group received IIV3 prime and boost at similar intervals. Primary study objectives included evaluation of the safety and tolerability of the vaccine regimens, with secondary objectives of measuring antibody responses at four weeks post boost by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and neutralization assays. RESULTS: Seventy-five children ≥6 to ≤17 years old enrolled. Local reactogenicity was higher after DNA prime compared to IIV3 prime (p<0.001 for pain/tenderness, redness, or swelling), but symptoms were mild to moderate in severity. Systemic reactogenicity was similar between vaccines. Overall, antibody responses were similar among groups, although HAI antibodies revealed a trend towards higher responses following 4 mg DNA-IIV3 compared to IIV3-IIV3. The fold increase of HAI antibodies to A/California/07/2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09] was significantly greater following 4 mg DNA-IIV3 (10.12 fold, 5.60-18.27 95%CI) compared to IIV3-IIV3 (3.86 fold, 2.32-6.44 95%CI). Similar neutralizing titers were observed between regimens, with a trend towards increased response frequencies in 4 mg DNA-IIV3. However, significant differences in fold increase, reported as geometric mean fold ratios, were detected against the H1N1 viruses within the neutralization panel: A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (1.41 fold, 1.10-1.81 95%CI) and A/South Carolina/1/1918 (1.55 fold, 1.27-1.89 95%CI). CONCLUSIONS: In this first pediatric DNA vaccine study conducted in the U.S., the DNA prime-IIV3 boost regimen was safe and well tolerated. In children, the 4 mg DNA-IIV3 regimen resulted in antibody responses comparable to the IIV3-IIV3 regimen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e0206837
JournalPLoS One
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Clinical Trials, Phase I
DNA Vaccines
randomized clinical trials
Influenza Vaccines
recombinant vaccines
influenza
Randomized Controlled Trials
vaccines
DNA
Hemagglutination
antibodies
Antibodies
Antibody Formation
Vaccines
hemagglutination
Viruses
neutralization
Needles
Human Influenza
New Caledonia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

DNA vaccine priming for seasonal influenza vaccine in children and adolescents 6 to 17 years of age : A phase 1 randomized clinical trial. / VRC 702 study team.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 13, No. 11, 01.01.2018, p. e0206837.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "DNA vaccine priming for seasonal influenza vaccine in children and adolescents 6 to 17 years of age: A phase 1 randomized clinical trial",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Children are susceptible to severe influenza infections and facilitate community transmission. One potential strategy to improve vaccine immunogenicity in children against seasonal influenza involves a trivalent hemagglutinin DNA prime-trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) boost regimen. METHODS: Sites enrolled adolescents, followed by younger children, to receive DNA prime (1 mg or 4 mg) intramuscularly by needle-free jet injector (Biojector), followed by split virus 2012/13 seasonal IIV3 boost by needle and syringe approximately 18 weeks later. A comparator group received IIV3 prime and boost at similar intervals. Primary study objectives included evaluation of the safety and tolerability of the vaccine regimens, with secondary objectives of measuring antibody responses at four weeks post boost by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and neutralization assays. RESULTS: Seventy-five children ≥6 to ≤17 years old enrolled. Local reactogenicity was higher after DNA prime compared to IIV3 prime (p<0.001 for pain/tenderness, redness, or swelling), but symptoms were mild to moderate in severity. Systemic reactogenicity was similar between vaccines. Overall, antibody responses were similar among groups, although HAI antibodies revealed a trend towards higher responses following 4 mg DNA-IIV3 compared to IIV3-IIV3. The fold increase of HAI antibodies to A/California/07/2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09] was significantly greater following 4 mg DNA-IIV3 (10.12 fold, 5.60-18.27 95{\%}CI) compared to IIV3-IIV3 (3.86 fold, 2.32-6.44 95{\%}CI). Similar neutralizing titers were observed between regimens, with a trend towards increased response frequencies in 4 mg DNA-IIV3. However, significant differences in fold increase, reported as geometric mean fold ratios, were detected against the H1N1 viruses within the neutralization panel: A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (1.41 fold, 1.10-1.81 95{\%}CI) and A/South Carolina/1/1918 (1.55 fold, 1.27-1.89 95{\%}CI). CONCLUSIONS: In this first pediatric DNA vaccine study conducted in the U.S., the DNA prime-IIV3 boost regimen was safe and well tolerated. In children, the 4 mg DNA-IIV3 regimen resulted in antibody responses comparable to the IIV3-IIV3 regimen.",
author = "{VRC 702 study team} and Houser, {Katherine V.} and Yamshchikov, {Galina V.} and Bellamy, {Abbie R.} and Jeanine May and Enama, {Mary E.} and Sarwar, {Uzma N.} and Brenda Larkin and Bailer, {Robert T.} and Richard Koup and Myeisha Paskel and Kanta Subbarao and Edwin Anderson and Bernstein, {David I.} and Buddy Creech and Harry Keyserling and Paul Spearman and Wright, {Peter F.} and Graham, {Barney S.} and Ledgerwood, {Julie E.}",
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T1 - DNA vaccine priming for seasonal influenza vaccine in children and adolescents 6 to 17 years of age

T2 - A phase 1 randomized clinical trial

AU - VRC 702 study team

AU - Houser, Katherine V.

AU - Yamshchikov, Galina V.

AU - Bellamy, Abbie R.

AU - May, Jeanine

AU - Enama, Mary E.

AU - Sarwar, Uzma N.

AU - Larkin, Brenda

AU - Bailer, Robert T.

AU - Koup, Richard

AU - Paskel, Myeisha

AU - Subbarao, Kanta

AU - Anderson, Edwin

AU - Bernstein, David I.

AU - Creech, Buddy

AU - Keyserling, Harry

AU - Spearman, Paul

AU - Wright, Peter F.

AU - Graham, Barney S.

AU - Ledgerwood, Julie E.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Children are susceptible to severe influenza infections and facilitate community transmission. One potential strategy to improve vaccine immunogenicity in children against seasonal influenza involves a trivalent hemagglutinin DNA prime-trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) boost regimen. METHODS: Sites enrolled adolescents, followed by younger children, to receive DNA prime (1 mg or 4 mg) intramuscularly by needle-free jet injector (Biojector), followed by split virus 2012/13 seasonal IIV3 boost by needle and syringe approximately 18 weeks later. A comparator group received IIV3 prime and boost at similar intervals. Primary study objectives included evaluation of the safety and tolerability of the vaccine regimens, with secondary objectives of measuring antibody responses at four weeks post boost by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and neutralization assays. RESULTS: Seventy-five children ≥6 to ≤17 years old enrolled. Local reactogenicity was higher after DNA prime compared to IIV3 prime (p<0.001 for pain/tenderness, redness, or swelling), but symptoms were mild to moderate in severity. Systemic reactogenicity was similar between vaccines. Overall, antibody responses were similar among groups, although HAI antibodies revealed a trend towards higher responses following 4 mg DNA-IIV3 compared to IIV3-IIV3. The fold increase of HAI antibodies to A/California/07/2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09] was significantly greater following 4 mg DNA-IIV3 (10.12 fold, 5.60-18.27 95%CI) compared to IIV3-IIV3 (3.86 fold, 2.32-6.44 95%CI). Similar neutralizing titers were observed between regimens, with a trend towards increased response frequencies in 4 mg DNA-IIV3. However, significant differences in fold increase, reported as geometric mean fold ratios, were detected against the H1N1 viruses within the neutralization panel: A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (1.41 fold, 1.10-1.81 95%CI) and A/South Carolina/1/1918 (1.55 fold, 1.27-1.89 95%CI). CONCLUSIONS: In this first pediatric DNA vaccine study conducted in the U.S., the DNA prime-IIV3 boost regimen was safe and well tolerated. In children, the 4 mg DNA-IIV3 regimen resulted in antibody responses comparable to the IIV3-IIV3 regimen.

AB - BACKGROUND: Children are susceptible to severe influenza infections and facilitate community transmission. One potential strategy to improve vaccine immunogenicity in children against seasonal influenza involves a trivalent hemagglutinin DNA prime-trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) boost regimen. METHODS: Sites enrolled adolescents, followed by younger children, to receive DNA prime (1 mg or 4 mg) intramuscularly by needle-free jet injector (Biojector), followed by split virus 2012/13 seasonal IIV3 boost by needle and syringe approximately 18 weeks later. A comparator group received IIV3 prime and boost at similar intervals. Primary study objectives included evaluation of the safety and tolerability of the vaccine regimens, with secondary objectives of measuring antibody responses at four weeks post boost by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and neutralization assays. RESULTS: Seventy-five children ≥6 to ≤17 years old enrolled. Local reactogenicity was higher after DNA prime compared to IIV3 prime (p<0.001 for pain/tenderness, redness, or swelling), but symptoms were mild to moderate in severity. Systemic reactogenicity was similar between vaccines. Overall, antibody responses were similar among groups, although HAI antibodies revealed a trend towards higher responses following 4 mg DNA-IIV3 compared to IIV3-IIV3. The fold increase of HAI antibodies to A/California/07/2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09] was significantly greater following 4 mg DNA-IIV3 (10.12 fold, 5.60-18.27 95%CI) compared to IIV3-IIV3 (3.86 fold, 2.32-6.44 95%CI). Similar neutralizing titers were observed between regimens, with a trend towards increased response frequencies in 4 mg DNA-IIV3. However, significant differences in fold increase, reported as geometric mean fold ratios, were detected against the H1N1 viruses within the neutralization panel: A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (1.41 fold, 1.10-1.81 95%CI) and A/South Carolina/1/1918 (1.55 fold, 1.27-1.89 95%CI). CONCLUSIONS: In this first pediatric DNA vaccine study conducted in the U.S., the DNA prime-IIV3 boost regimen was safe and well tolerated. In children, the 4 mg DNA-IIV3 regimen resulted in antibody responses comparable to the IIV3-IIV3 regimen.

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SN - 1932-6203

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