Dizziness and vertigo

Andrew K. Chang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Scope of the problem Dizziness, a common complaint in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED), is a disorder of spatial orientation. It is the most common complaint in patients over the age of 75 years. Approximately 7% of ED patients present with dizziness. Dizzy patients account for 1.5% of hospital admissions. Evaluating the dizzy patient can be challenging, since it is a nonspecific symptom and is difficult to objectively measure. Although most cases are usually benign, emergency physicians need to be wary about life-threatening causes of dizziness, such as cardiac dysrhythmias and cerebrovascular events. In some cases, however, the patient can be cured at the bedside.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAn Introduction to Clinical Emergency Medicine
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages289-299
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9780511852091
ISBN (Print)9780521747769
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Vertigo
Dizziness
Hospital Emergency Service
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Emergencies
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chang, A. K. (2012). Dizziness and vertigo. In An Introduction to Clinical Emergency Medicine (pp. 289-299). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511852091.029

Dizziness and vertigo. / Chang, Andrew K.

An Introduction to Clinical Emergency Medicine. Cambridge University Press, 2012. p. 289-299.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Chang, AK 2012, Dizziness and vertigo. in An Introduction to Clinical Emergency Medicine. Cambridge University Press, pp. 289-299. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511852091.029
Chang AK. Dizziness and vertigo. In An Introduction to Clinical Emergency Medicine. Cambridge University Press. 2012. p. 289-299 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511852091.029
Chang, Andrew K. / Dizziness and vertigo. An Introduction to Clinical Emergency Medicine. Cambridge University Press, 2012. pp. 289-299
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