Diversity in academic medicine no. 3

Struggle for survival among leading diversity programs

Alvin H. Strelnick, Vera S. Taylor, Beverly Williams, Elizabeth Lee-Rey, Janice Herbert-Carter, Yvonne W. Fry-Johnson, Quentin T. Smith, George Rust, Kofi Kondwani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since efforts to increase the diversity of academic medicine began shortly after the Civil War, the efforts have been characterized by a ceaseless struggle of old and new programs to survive. In the 40 years after the Civil War, the number of minority-serving institutions grew from 2 to 9, and then the number fell again to 2 in response to an adverse evaluation by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. For 50 years, the programs grew slowly, picking up speed only after the passage of landmark civil rights legislation in the 1960s. From 1987 through 2005, they expanded rapidly, fueled by such new federal programs as the Centers of Excellence and Health Careers Opportunity Programs. Encompassing majority-white institutions as well as minority-serving institutions, the number of Centers of Excellence grew to 34, and the number of Health Careers Opportunity Programs grew to 74. Then, in 2006, the federal government cut its funding abruptly and drastically, reducing the number of Centers of Excellence and Health Careers Opportunity Programs to 4 each. Several advocacy groups, supported by think tanks, have striven to restore federal funding to previous levels, so far to no avail. Meanwhile, the struggle to increase the representation of underrepresented minorities in the health professions is carried on by the surviving programs, including the remaining Centers of Excellence and Health Careers Opportunity Programs and new programs that, funded by state, local, and private agencies, have arisen from the ashes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)504-516
Number of pages13
JournalMount Sinai Journal of Medicine
Volume75
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

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Medicine
Health
Minority Health
Civil Rights
Federal Government
Health Occupations
Legislation
Teaching
Warfare

Keywords

  • Academic diversity
  • Academic medicine
  • Center of excellence
  • Faculty development program
  • Health Careers Opportunity Program
  • Historically black colleges and universities
  • Minority faculty
  • Minority faculty development
  • Minority-serving institution
  • Underresented minority

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Strelnick, A. H., Taylor, V. S., Williams, B., Lee-Rey, E., Herbert-Carter, J., Fry-Johnson, Y. W., ... Kondwani, K. (2008). Diversity in academic medicine no. 3: Struggle for survival among leading diversity programs. Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, 75(6), 504-516. https://doi.org/10.1002/msj.20081

Diversity in academic medicine no. 3 : Struggle for survival among leading diversity programs. / Strelnick, Alvin H.; Taylor, Vera S.; Williams, Beverly; Lee-Rey, Elizabeth; Herbert-Carter, Janice; Fry-Johnson, Yvonne W.; Smith, Quentin T.; Rust, George; Kondwani, Kofi.

In: Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, Vol. 75, No. 6, 01.12.2008, p. 504-516.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strelnick, AH, Taylor, VS, Williams, B, Lee-Rey, E, Herbert-Carter, J, Fry-Johnson, YW, Smith, QT, Rust, G & Kondwani, K 2008, 'Diversity in academic medicine no. 3: Struggle for survival among leading diversity programs', Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, vol. 75, no. 6, pp. 504-516. https://doi.org/10.1002/msj.20081
Strelnick, Alvin H. ; Taylor, Vera S. ; Williams, Beverly ; Lee-Rey, Elizabeth ; Herbert-Carter, Janice ; Fry-Johnson, Yvonne W. ; Smith, Quentin T. ; Rust, George ; Kondwani, Kofi. / Diversity in academic medicine no. 3 : Struggle for survival among leading diversity programs. In: Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 75, No. 6. pp. 504-516.
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