Discordance between aeroallergen specific serum IgE and skin testing in children younger than 4 years

Gabriele De Vos, Ramin Nazari, Denisa E. Ferastraoaru, Purvi Parikh, Rebecca Geliebter, Yikania Pichardo, Andrew Wiznia, David L. Rosenstreich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Atopic sensitization to aeroallergens in early life has been found to be a strong risk factor for the development of persisting asthma in young children with recurrent wheeze. Objective: To assess the yield of skin prick test (SPT) compared with allergen specific serum IgE (sIgE) testing at identifying aeroallergen sensitization in atopic children younger than 4 years. Methods: Concordance between SPT and allergen-specific sIgE testing for 7 common aeroallergens was analyzed in 40 atopic inner-city children 18 to 48 months of age (mean [SD], 36 [9] months) with recurrent wheezing and family history of asthma and/or eczema. Results: In 80% of children one or more allergen sensitizations would have been missed if only SPT had been performed, and in 38% of children one or more sensitizations would have been missed if only sIgE testing had been performed. Agreement between the SPT and sIgE test was fair for most allergens (κ = -0.04 to 0.50), as was correlation between sIgE levels and SPT grade (ρ = 0.21 to 0.55). Children with high total sIgE (≥300 kU/L) were more likely to have positive sIgE test results, with negative corresponding SPT results (P =.02). Conclusion: Our study revealed a significant discordance between allergen-specific SPT and sIgE testing results for common aeroallergens, suggesting that both SPT and sIgE testing should be performed when diagnosing allergic sensitization in young children at high risk of asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)438-443
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume110
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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Immunoglobulin E
Skin Tests
Skin
Allergens
Serum
Asthma
Eczema
Respiratory Sounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Discordance between aeroallergen specific serum IgE and skin testing in children younger than 4 years. / De Vos, Gabriele; Nazari, Ramin; Ferastraoaru, Denisa E.; Parikh, Purvi; Geliebter, Rebecca; Pichardo, Yikania; Wiznia, Andrew; Rosenstreich, David L.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 110, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 438-443.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Vos, Gabriele ; Nazari, Ramin ; Ferastraoaru, Denisa E. ; Parikh, Purvi ; Geliebter, Rebecca ; Pichardo, Yikania ; Wiznia, Andrew ; Rosenstreich, David L. / Discordance between aeroallergen specific serum IgE and skin testing in children younger than 4 years. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2013 ; Vol. 110, No. 6. pp. 438-443.
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abstract = "Background: Atopic sensitization to aeroallergens in early life has been found to be a strong risk factor for the development of persisting asthma in young children with recurrent wheeze. Objective: To assess the yield of skin prick test (SPT) compared with allergen specific serum IgE (sIgE) testing at identifying aeroallergen sensitization in atopic children younger than 4 years. Methods: Concordance between SPT and allergen-specific sIgE testing for 7 common aeroallergens was analyzed in 40 atopic inner-city children 18 to 48 months of age (mean [SD], 36 [9] months) with recurrent wheezing and family history of asthma and/or eczema. Results: In 80{\%} of children one or more allergen sensitizations would have been missed if only SPT had been performed, and in 38{\%} of children one or more sensitizations would have been missed if only sIgE testing had been performed. Agreement between the SPT and sIgE test was fair for most allergens (κ = -0.04 to 0.50), as was correlation between sIgE levels and SPT grade (ρ = 0.21 to 0.55). Children with high total sIgE (≥300 kU/L) were more likely to have positive sIgE test results, with negative corresponding SPT results (P =.02). Conclusion: Our study revealed a significant discordance between allergen-specific SPT and sIgE testing results for common aeroallergens, suggesting that both SPT and sIgE testing should be performed when diagnosing allergic sensitization in young children at high risk of asthma.",
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AU - De Vos, Gabriele

AU - Nazari, Ramin

AU - Ferastraoaru, Denisa E.

AU - Parikh, Purvi

AU - Geliebter, Rebecca

AU - Pichardo, Yikania

AU - Wiznia, Andrew

AU - Rosenstreich, David L.

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N2 - Background: Atopic sensitization to aeroallergens in early life has been found to be a strong risk factor for the development of persisting asthma in young children with recurrent wheeze. Objective: To assess the yield of skin prick test (SPT) compared with allergen specific serum IgE (sIgE) testing at identifying aeroallergen sensitization in atopic children younger than 4 years. Methods: Concordance between SPT and allergen-specific sIgE testing for 7 common aeroallergens was analyzed in 40 atopic inner-city children 18 to 48 months of age (mean [SD], 36 [9] months) with recurrent wheezing and family history of asthma and/or eczema. Results: In 80% of children one or more allergen sensitizations would have been missed if only SPT had been performed, and in 38% of children one or more sensitizations would have been missed if only sIgE testing had been performed. Agreement between the SPT and sIgE test was fair for most allergens (κ = -0.04 to 0.50), as was correlation between sIgE levels and SPT grade (ρ = 0.21 to 0.55). Children with high total sIgE (≥300 kU/L) were more likely to have positive sIgE test results, with negative corresponding SPT results (P =.02). Conclusion: Our study revealed a significant discordance between allergen-specific SPT and sIgE testing results for common aeroallergens, suggesting that both SPT and sIgE testing should be performed when diagnosing allergic sensitization in young children at high risk of asthma.

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