Differential effects of cytolytic T cell subsets on intracellular infection

Steffen Stenger, Richard J. Mazzaccaro, Koichi Uyemura, Sungae Cho, Peter F. Barnes, Jean Pierre Rosat, Alessandro Sette, Michael B. Brenner, Steven A. Porcelli, Barry R. Bloom, Robert L. Modlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

411 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In analyzing mechanisms of protection against intracellular infections, a series of human CD1-restricted T cell lines of two distinct phenotypes were derived. Both CD4-CD8- (double-negative) T cells and CD8+ T cells efficiently lysed macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The cytotoxicity of CD4-CD8- T cells was mediated by Fas-FasL interaction and had no effect on the viability of the mycobacteria. The CD8+ T cells lysed infected macrophages by a Fas-independent, granule-dependent mechanism that resulted in killing of bacteria. These data indicate that two phenotypically distinct subsets of human cytolytic T lymphocytes use different mechanisms to kill infected cells and contribute in different ways to host defense against intracellular infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1684-1687
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume276
Issue number5319
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 13 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

T-Lymphocyte Subsets
T-Lymphocytes
Infection
Macrophages
Mycobacterium
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Bacteria
Phenotype
Cell Line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Stenger, S., Mazzaccaro, R. J., Uyemura, K., Cho, S., Barnes, P. F., Rosat, J. P., ... Modlin, R. L. (1997). Differential effects of cytolytic T cell subsets on intracellular infection. Science, 276(5319), 1684-1687. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.276.5319.1684

Differential effects of cytolytic T cell subsets on intracellular infection. / Stenger, Steffen; Mazzaccaro, Richard J.; Uyemura, Koichi; Cho, Sungae; Barnes, Peter F.; Rosat, Jean Pierre; Sette, Alessandro; Brenner, Michael B.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

In: Science, Vol. 276, No. 5319, 13.06.1997, p. 1684-1687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stenger, S, Mazzaccaro, RJ, Uyemura, K, Cho, S, Barnes, PF, Rosat, JP, Sette, A, Brenner, MB, Porcelli, SA, Bloom, BR & Modlin, RL 1997, 'Differential effects of cytolytic T cell subsets on intracellular infection', Science, vol. 276, no. 5319, pp. 1684-1687. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.276.5319.1684
Stenger S, Mazzaccaro RJ, Uyemura K, Cho S, Barnes PF, Rosat JP et al. Differential effects of cytolytic T cell subsets on intracellular infection. Science. 1997 Jun 13;276(5319):1684-1687. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.276.5319.1684
Stenger, Steffen ; Mazzaccaro, Richard J. ; Uyemura, Koichi ; Cho, Sungae ; Barnes, Peter F. ; Rosat, Jean Pierre ; Sette, Alessandro ; Brenner, Michael B. ; Porcelli, Steven A. ; Bloom, Barry R. ; Modlin, Robert L. / Differential effects of cytolytic T cell subsets on intracellular infection. In: Science. 1997 ; Vol. 276, No. 5319. pp. 1684-1687.
@article{2ee34d5293a84a709fd928bac06269d7,
title = "Differential effects of cytolytic T cell subsets on intracellular infection",
abstract = "In analyzing mechanisms of protection against intracellular infections, a series of human CD1-restricted T cell lines of two distinct phenotypes were derived. Both CD4-CD8- (double-negative) T cells and CD8+ T cells efficiently lysed macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The cytotoxicity of CD4-CD8- T cells was mediated by Fas-FasL interaction and had no effect on the viability of the mycobacteria. The CD8+ T cells lysed infected macrophages by a Fas-independent, granule-dependent mechanism that resulted in killing of bacteria. These data indicate that two phenotypically distinct subsets of human cytolytic T lymphocytes use different mechanisms to kill infected cells and contribute in different ways to host defense against intracellular infection.",
author = "Steffen Stenger and Mazzaccaro, {Richard J.} and Koichi Uyemura and Sungae Cho and Barnes, {Peter F.} and Rosat, {Jean Pierre} and Alessandro Sette and Brenner, {Michael B.} and Porcelli, {Steven A.} and Bloom, {Barry R.} and Modlin, {Robert L.}",
year = "1997",
month = "6",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1126/science.276.5319.1684",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "276",
pages = "1684--1687",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "5319",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differential effects of cytolytic T cell subsets on intracellular infection

AU - Stenger, Steffen

AU - Mazzaccaro, Richard J.

AU - Uyemura, Koichi

AU - Cho, Sungae

AU - Barnes, Peter F.

AU - Rosat, Jean Pierre

AU - Sette, Alessandro

AU - Brenner, Michael B.

AU - Porcelli, Steven A.

AU - Bloom, Barry R.

AU - Modlin, Robert L.

PY - 1997/6/13

Y1 - 1997/6/13

N2 - In analyzing mechanisms of protection against intracellular infections, a series of human CD1-restricted T cell lines of two distinct phenotypes were derived. Both CD4-CD8- (double-negative) T cells and CD8+ T cells efficiently lysed macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The cytotoxicity of CD4-CD8- T cells was mediated by Fas-FasL interaction and had no effect on the viability of the mycobacteria. The CD8+ T cells lysed infected macrophages by a Fas-independent, granule-dependent mechanism that resulted in killing of bacteria. These data indicate that two phenotypically distinct subsets of human cytolytic T lymphocytes use different mechanisms to kill infected cells and contribute in different ways to host defense against intracellular infection.

AB - In analyzing mechanisms of protection against intracellular infections, a series of human CD1-restricted T cell lines of two distinct phenotypes were derived. Both CD4-CD8- (double-negative) T cells and CD8+ T cells efficiently lysed macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The cytotoxicity of CD4-CD8- T cells was mediated by Fas-FasL interaction and had no effect on the viability of the mycobacteria. The CD8+ T cells lysed infected macrophages by a Fas-independent, granule-dependent mechanism that resulted in killing of bacteria. These data indicate that two phenotypically distinct subsets of human cytolytic T lymphocytes use different mechanisms to kill infected cells and contribute in different ways to host defense against intracellular infection.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030765980&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030765980&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.276.5319.1684

DO - 10.1126/science.276.5319.1684

M3 - Article

C2 - 9180075

AN - SCOPUS:0030765980

VL - 276

SP - 1684

EP - 1687

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 5319

ER -