Dietary Patterns in Chinese Americans are Associated with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors, the Chinese American Cardiovascular Health Assessment (CHA CHA)

Jeannette M. Beasley, Stella S. Yi, Jiyoung Ahn, Simona C. Kwon, Judith Wylie-Rosett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about the dietary patterns of Chinese Americans. Understanding their dietary patterns can provide insights for addressing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among Chinese American immigrants. The objective of this study was to identify dietary patterns among Chinese American immigrants living in New York City (NYC) and to describe associations with demographic and CVD risk factors. A validated Food Frequency Questionnaire assessed usual dietary intake in Chinese American immigrants living in NYC as part of the Chinese American Cardiovascular Health Assessment (CHA CHA) in 2010–2011 (n = 1973, age range 21–89 years). Principal components analysis with varimax rotation retaining three factors with eigenvalues > 1.5 identified dietary patterns. Multivariable linear regression models tested associations between CVD risk factors and dietary pattern scores. In multivariable analyses, each unit of increase in the Sweets factor was associated with 0.76 ± 0.33 (mean ± SD) mg/dL higher HDL cholesterol and a 6.2 ± 2.7% increase in HOMA-IR. In contrast, each unit increase in the Fried Noodles factor was associated with a 0.27 ± 0.11 inch greater waist circumference, − 0.89 ± 0.40 mg/dL lower HDL cholesterol, and also a 6.9 ± 2.6% increase in HOMA-IR. Each unit increase in the Vegetables factor was associated with a − 1.40 ± 0.43 mmHg and − 0.95 ± 0.27 mm Hg decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Dietary patterns are significantly associated with CVD risk factors among Chinese American immigrants in NYC. Future work will inform how dietary patterns relate to level of acculturation in order to guide the development of dietary interventions to reduce CVD risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Asian Americans
Cardiovascular Diseases
Health
HDL Cholesterol
Linear Models
Blood Pressure
Acculturation
Waist Circumference
Principal Component Analysis
Vegetables
Demography
Food

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease risk
  • Chinese Americans
  • Dietary patterns
  • Immigrant populations
  • Urban health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{29f4ee1c046146acb2de8ba8b9321255,
title = "Dietary Patterns in Chinese Americans are Associated with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors, the Chinese American Cardiovascular Health Assessment (CHA CHA)",
abstract = "Little is known about the dietary patterns of Chinese Americans. Understanding their dietary patterns can provide insights for addressing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among Chinese American immigrants. The objective of this study was to identify dietary patterns among Chinese American immigrants living in New York City (NYC) and to describe associations with demographic and CVD risk factors. A validated Food Frequency Questionnaire assessed usual dietary intake in Chinese American immigrants living in NYC as part of the Chinese American Cardiovascular Health Assessment (CHA CHA) in 2010–2011 (n = 1973, age range 21–89 years). Principal components analysis with varimax rotation retaining three factors with eigenvalues > 1.5 identified dietary patterns. Multivariable linear regression models tested associations between CVD risk factors and dietary pattern scores. In multivariable analyses, each unit of increase in the Sweets factor was associated with 0.76 ± 0.33 (mean ± SD) mg/dL higher HDL cholesterol and a 6.2 ± 2.7{\%} increase in HOMA-IR. In contrast, each unit increase in the Fried Noodles factor was associated with a 0.27 ± 0.11 inch greater waist circumference, − 0.89 ± 0.40 mg/dL lower HDL cholesterol, and also a 6.9 ± 2.6{\%} increase in HOMA-IR. Each unit increase in the Vegetables factor was associated with a − 1.40 ± 0.43 mmHg and − 0.95 ± 0.27 mm Hg decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Dietary patterns are significantly associated with CVD risk factors among Chinese American immigrants in NYC. Future work will inform how dietary patterns relate to level of acculturation in order to guide the development of dietary interventions to reduce CVD risk.",
keywords = "Cardiovascular disease risk, Chinese Americans, Dietary patterns, Immigrant populations, Urban health",
author = "Beasley, {Jeannette M.} and Yi, {Stella S.} and Jiyoung Ahn and Kwon, {Simona C.} and Judith Wylie-Rosett",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
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doi = "10.1007/s10903-018-0800-z",
language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Dietary Patterns in Chinese Americans are Associated with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors, the Chinese American Cardiovascular Health Assessment (CHA CHA)

AU - Beasley, Jeannette M.

AU - Yi, Stella S.

AU - Ahn, Jiyoung

AU - Kwon, Simona C.

AU - Wylie-Rosett, Judith

PY - 2018/1/1

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N2 - Little is known about the dietary patterns of Chinese Americans. Understanding their dietary patterns can provide insights for addressing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among Chinese American immigrants. The objective of this study was to identify dietary patterns among Chinese American immigrants living in New York City (NYC) and to describe associations with demographic and CVD risk factors. A validated Food Frequency Questionnaire assessed usual dietary intake in Chinese American immigrants living in NYC as part of the Chinese American Cardiovascular Health Assessment (CHA CHA) in 2010–2011 (n = 1973, age range 21–89 years). Principal components analysis with varimax rotation retaining three factors with eigenvalues > 1.5 identified dietary patterns. Multivariable linear regression models tested associations between CVD risk factors and dietary pattern scores. In multivariable analyses, each unit of increase in the Sweets factor was associated with 0.76 ± 0.33 (mean ± SD) mg/dL higher HDL cholesterol and a 6.2 ± 2.7% increase in HOMA-IR. In contrast, each unit increase in the Fried Noodles factor was associated with a 0.27 ± 0.11 inch greater waist circumference, − 0.89 ± 0.40 mg/dL lower HDL cholesterol, and also a 6.9 ± 2.6% increase in HOMA-IR. Each unit increase in the Vegetables factor was associated with a − 1.40 ± 0.43 mmHg and − 0.95 ± 0.27 mm Hg decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Dietary patterns are significantly associated with CVD risk factors among Chinese American immigrants in NYC. Future work will inform how dietary patterns relate to level of acculturation in order to guide the development of dietary interventions to reduce CVD risk.

AB - Little is known about the dietary patterns of Chinese Americans. Understanding their dietary patterns can provide insights for addressing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among Chinese American immigrants. The objective of this study was to identify dietary patterns among Chinese American immigrants living in New York City (NYC) and to describe associations with demographic and CVD risk factors. A validated Food Frequency Questionnaire assessed usual dietary intake in Chinese American immigrants living in NYC as part of the Chinese American Cardiovascular Health Assessment (CHA CHA) in 2010–2011 (n = 1973, age range 21–89 years). Principal components analysis with varimax rotation retaining three factors with eigenvalues > 1.5 identified dietary patterns. Multivariable linear regression models tested associations between CVD risk factors and dietary pattern scores. In multivariable analyses, each unit of increase in the Sweets factor was associated with 0.76 ± 0.33 (mean ± SD) mg/dL higher HDL cholesterol and a 6.2 ± 2.7% increase in HOMA-IR. In contrast, each unit increase in the Fried Noodles factor was associated with a 0.27 ± 0.11 inch greater waist circumference, − 0.89 ± 0.40 mg/dL lower HDL cholesterol, and also a 6.9 ± 2.6% increase in HOMA-IR. Each unit increase in the Vegetables factor was associated with a − 1.40 ± 0.43 mmHg and − 0.95 ± 0.27 mm Hg decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Dietary patterns are significantly associated with CVD risk factors among Chinese American immigrants in NYC. Future work will inform how dietary patterns relate to level of acculturation in order to guide the development of dietary interventions to reduce CVD risk.

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